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Originally Posted by borromini Hotplug and udev are required right? I plug in USB-stick & HD's once in a while. Right now I have this when I do # service ...
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by borromini
    Hotplug and udev are required right? I plug in USB-stick & HD's once in a while. Right now I have this when I do # service list:
    root[stijn]# service list
    acpid : [on]
    alsa : [on]
    cups : [on]
    discover : [off]
    gpm : [on]
    hotplug : [on]
    howl : [on]
    inetd : [on]
    ip_forward : [off]
    modules : [on]
    netfilter : [on]
    nfsd : [on]
    pcmcia : [off]
    portmap : [off]
    postinstall : [off]
    serial : [off]
    sshd : [off]
    syslog : [on]
    sysvinit : [on]
    udev : [on]
    If you mostly use X, you can disable GPM aswell (the console mousedriver). Inetd isn't needed unless you want to run spesific servers on your machine, If you roll your own kernel, you can disable "modules" too, in addition to creating a faster loading, less ram-using and in some cases a faster performing kernel. If you roll your own kernel, hotplug ain't needed anymore neither, but can be useful to make udev create device nods on fly.

    And anomie, how do you configure a static IP behind a dhcp server? Can I just choose whatever IP I want?

  2. #22
    Linux Guru anomie's Avatar
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    And anomie, how do you configure a static IP behind a dhcp server? Can I just choose whatever IP I want?
    The best thing to do would be to have a look at your dhcp server and see if there is a range of addresses it gives out, e.g. 192.168.1.150 - 192.168.1.254.

    You will definitely want to choose a static IP that is not in the range that the dhcp server will give out. So in this case if you choose something like 192.168.1.10 you are ok (assuming another device on your network does not have it already, of course).

  3. #23
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    My box is the only one behind the dhcp server... But I'll check it out, thanx.

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  5. #24
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    I notice that during startup, some time is consumed in searching for floppy, which I don't even have on my laptop. Where do I turn that off? Also, there are several other external stuff that can't be found - eth0, ath0, etc. Eth0 is, I assume, the wireless card, which I have but which I haven't come around to installing drivers to., but the other stuff...
    So if someone has advice on (1) how to list the stuff that I have/should have; (2) where I can set which devices are searched for during bootup, (3) where that list that flashes by during boot is stored (I guess it must be logged somewhere?), so that I can check later on what is happening...

    Yes, I'm a noob...

  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by psic
    Another thing I ran into (though I think it's debian-specific):
    http://www.debian-administration.org/articles/199
    Looks pretty nice... I'll check how many of that applies to a Slackware system. Thanks man!

    Quote Originally Posted by jaboua
    Quote Originally Posted by borromini
    Hotplug and udev are required right? I plug in USB-stick & HD's once in a while. Right now I have this when I do # service list:
    root[stijn]# service list
    acpid : [on]
    alsa : [on]
    cups : [on]
    discover : [off]
    gpm : [on]
    hotplug : [on]
    howl : [on]
    inetd : [on]
    ip_forward : [off]
    modules : [on]
    netfilter : [on]
    nfsd : [on]
    pcmcia : [off]
    portmap : [off]
    postinstall : [off]
    serial : [off]
    sshd : [off]
    syslog : [on]
    sysvinit : [on]
    udev : [on]
    If you mostly use X, you can disable GPM aswell (the console mousedriver). Inetd isn't needed unless you want to run spesific servers on your machine, If you roll your own kernel, you can disable "modules" too, in addition to creating a faster loading, less ram-using and in some cases a faster performing kernel. If you roll your own kernel, hotplug ain't needed anymore neither, but can be useful to make udev create device nods on fly.

    And anomie, how do you configure a static IP behind a dhcp server? Can I just choose whatever IP I want?
    Ok! I thougth inetd was pretty essential, but it's a server service... That makes things clear (and I will disable it, thanks ). Same for gpm .

    As for modules, I did compile my own kernel. So you suggest compiling it all in statically, and not as a module? I have a few things compiled as a module (ACPI amongst others). But I noticed my modules dir is 6 MB, and my kernel 1.5. If I compile all modules statically, how will this affect my kernel size (and kernel boot performance)? Suppose I disable hotplug, will I still be able to mount USB sticks (I think my scanner needs hotplug too, it's a USB device)?

    I'll look into the static IP also, I always get the same IP from my router, so that can't be a problem.
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  7. #26
    Linux Guru loft306's Avatar
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    Dunno but i got gentoo and suse (mostly gentoo) and gentoo boots in 30s or less to 'X' even on my slowest machine(66mhz 486) but then there is suse and that is mostly because af the suse built kernel with the 'initrd' and can take a few minutes to boot.....(if i boot suse with the gentoo kernel it is just as fast) 98se is faster than the suse initrd kernel

    currently i only run all kernel drivers except for alsa and nvidia (so 2 modules)
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  8. #27
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    OK, I found this one: http://www-128.ibm.com/developerwork...ry/l-boot.html Straight from Big Blue, but it's linux-general, surely looks interesting .
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  9. #28
    oz
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    borromini... Intel says they are working on it:

    http://www.zdnetasia.com/news/hardwa...9280398,00.htm

  10. #29
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    Thanks, I read that too... But that's just switching to another form of storage. The relative slowliness of a Linux boot process will remain. Intel's concept will not reach the consumer market that fast I think, first they're gonna serve the enterprise market.
    ** Registered Linux User # 393717 and proud of it ** Check out www.zenwalk.org
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  11. #30
    oz
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    My most recent Arch Linux setup is booting pretty fast these days.

    From the moment of selecting my distro name in the GRUB menu to a fully loaded FVWM in X is about 15 seconds, total. That's possible by running the 2.6.15.1 kernel, udev 079, and hwdetect. Note that I've deleted hotplug altogether. I'm thinking it might be possible to trim off another second or two if I should background some of the daemons at system boot, but I'm pretty happy with it, as is.

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