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I had to much problems with the bsdplatform and my earlier expiriences with redhat made me re-install my web/ftp server. Redhat 9 is now installed and works perfect! Except one ...
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  1. #1
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    mount OpenBSD partition in redhat 9 (shrike)


    I had to much problems with the bsdplatform and my earlier expiriences with redhat made me re-install my web/ftp server.
    Redhat 9 is now installed and works perfect!
    Except one thing. I have another physical harddrive with a 27 gb OpenBSD partition in the machine, and it won't mount in redhat.

    when i try to mount it i use this command:

    'mount -t 44bsd /dev/hdb4 /mnt/test/'

    and i get:

    'mount: fs type 44bsd not supported by kernel'

    Am i using mount properly or must i compile an new kernel, and how in the %§"&/#% do i do that?

  2. #2
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    I dont think the -t 44dsd is a valid file system format supported by mount? I looked in the man page, for -t it says

    -t vfstype
    The argument following the -t is used to indicate the file system type. The file system types which are currently supported are: adfs,
    affs, autofs, coda, coherent, cramfs, devpts, efs, ext, ext2, ext3, hfs, hpfs, iso9660, jfs, minix, msdos, ncpfs, nfs, ntfs, proc, qnx4,
    ramfs, reiserfs, romfs, smbfs, sysv, tmpfs, udf, ufs, umsdos, vfat, xenix, xfs, xiafs. Note that coherent, sysv and xenix are equivalent
    and that xenix and coherent will be removed at some point in the future -- use sysv instead. Since kernel version 2.1.21 the types ext and
    xiafs do not exist anymore.

    For most types all the mount program has to do is issue a simple mount(2) system call, and no detailed knowledge of the filesystem type is
    required. For a few types however (like nfs, smbfs, ncpfs) ad hoc code is necessary. The nfs ad hoc code is built in, but smbfs and ncpfs
    have a separate mount program. In order to make it possible to treat all types in a uniform way, mount will execute the program
    /sbin/mount.TYPE (if that exists) when called with type TYPE. Since various versions of the smbmount program have different calling con-
    ventions, /sbin/mount.smbfs may have to be a shell script that sets up the desired call.

    The type iso9660 is the default. If no -t option is given, or if the auto type is specified, the superblock is probed for the filesystem
    type (adfs, bfs, cramfs, ext, ext2, ext3, hfs, hpfs, iso9660, jfs, minix, ntfs, qnx4, reiserfs, romfs, udf, ufs, vxfs, xfs, xiafs are sup-
    ported). If this probe fails, mount will try to read the file /etc/filesystems, or, if that does not exist, /proc/filesystems. All of
    the filesystem types listed there will be tried, except for those that are labeled "nodev" (e.g., devpts, proc and nfs). If /etc/filesys-
    tems ends in a line with a single * only, mount will read /proc/filesystems afterwards.

    The auto type may be useful for user-mounted floppies. Creating a file /etc/filesystems can be useful to change the probe order (e.g., to
    try vfat before msdos) or if you use a kernel module autoloader. Warning: the probing uses a heuristic (the presence of appropriate
    `magic'), and could recognize the wrong filesystem type, possibly with catastrophic consequences. If your data is valuable, don't ask
    mount to guess.

    More than one type may be specified in a comma separated list. The list of file system types can be prefixed with no to specify the file
    system types on which no action should be taken. (This can be meaningful with the -a option.)

    For example, the command:
    mount -a -t nomsdos,ext
    mounts all file systems except those of type msdos and ext.

    i didnt see 44dsd listed?

  3. #3
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    yep, thats correct, but the manual says something like this a bit further down:

    "Mount options for ufs
    ufstype=value..."

    "...44bsd For filesystems created by a BSD-like system
    (NetBSD,FreeBSD,OpenBSD)."

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  5. #4
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    Re: mount OpenBSD partition in redhat 9 (shrike)

    Quote Originally Posted by ner
    'mount -t 44dsd /dev/hdb4 /mnt/test/'

    and i get:

    'mount: fs type 44dsd not supported by kernel'
    Try:
    mount -t 44bsd /dev/hdb4 /mnt/test/

    (44dsd to 44bsd)

    does that do it?

    Jason

  6. #5
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    jaguar: no, that's just bad spelling (or something)
    i've fixed the original post.

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