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Yo all. I'm havin difficulties doing an FTP suse install. I've done all the required steps as stated in suse's README.FTP file a zillion times. Did boot and modules floppies ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined!
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    SuSE FTP install problems.


    Yo all.

    I'm havin difficulties doing an FTP suse install.
    I've done all the required steps as stated in suse's README.FTP file a zillion times.
    Did boot and modules floppies yadda... yadda... yadda...
    No joy. I always end up with a dead black screen and a frozen box after about one minute.

    Now I would like to try the FTP install of suse from mandrake. This is my setup:
    2 hd's, one with mandrake on, the other empty and mounted as /mnt/disk2 in mandrake.
    I would like to install suse on the empty hd, but I would like to do it from the comfort of mandrake rather than from a boot floppy.

    I've copied the files from the boot floppy into a directory, but I can't get anything going with them from the command line.
    I get "cannot execute binary file" all the time.

    All I need is to get the suse installer going.

    So please, share your wisdom, my fellow penguins.

  2. #2
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    Täby, Sweden
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    Hmmm... I doubt this is officially supported, but here's the way I'd attempt it:
    The installer's boot floppy is probably VFAT, which means that all files are executable, even if they are not truly meant to be executed. That's probably why you get cannot execute binary file. Anyway, the installer probably loads a gzipped initrd image. Find it, unzip it, mount it at like /mnt/initrd with fs type ext2 and a loop device. Then find the intended init program in /mnt/initrd (it's probably named rclinux or so... I don't really remember what the standard is), and execute it in a chroot(1) jail (chrooted to /mnt/initrd, of course). Remember that you must be root to chroot.
    I'm really not sure it will work the way you want it to (actually, I'm not sure it works at all, but there's a good chance), since the boot floppy expects to be the only thing running on your system. It's very possible that it will actually reboot your computer when it says it will, for example.
    This was an interesting real-world problem, though. It had me thinking for surely half a minute, which is quite unusual. Thanks for the entertainment!
    Beware: I have probably forgot several things. I usually do in quick solutions.

  3. #3
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    Thanks. I'll give that a go.

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