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I have seen on some redhat mchines after booting when the system comes to the login prompt, there are messages sayin "init.d respawining too fast, wait for 5 secs" any ...
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  1. #1
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    respawning too fast message.


    I have seen on some redhat mchines after booting when the system comes to the login prompt, there are messages sayin
    "init.d respawining too fast, wait for 5 secs" any idea why these messages are seen??
    Fixing Unix is better than working with Windows.
    http://nikhilk.homedns.org/projects/index.html

  2. #2
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    I've never seen that. I don't really think that message really makes sense. Are you really sure that it's "init.d" and not something else?

  3. #3
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    hmm...now that you say it i dont remember correctly...but it sure starts
    with "init" somethg....has anyone ever come across such a message?
    Fixing Unix is better than working with Windows.
    http://nikhilk.homedns.org/projects/index.html

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  5. #4
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    Oh yes, most certainly. It probably says something along the lines of this: "init: xxx respawning too fast, disabling for 5 minutes".
    Your /etc/inittab contains a couple of lines that describe to init what processes should be running in each runlevel. Some of these programs have the "respawn" flag, which tells init to restart it when it exits. When one of these programs error out so that it exits as soon as it's started, init will detect that it's respawning too fast and will disable it for 5 minutes to reduce the system load. The line that init spits at you will tell you the ID to look up in /etc/inittab.

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