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there is a file missing from my windows 2000 /system32 directory and therefore i can't boot windows..... i have mounted the windows partition to /mnt/hdd in linux but i cannot ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Swansea (UK)
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    221

    File Copy problem


    there is a file missing from my windows 2000 /system32 directory and therefore i can't boot windows..... i have mounted the windows partition to /mnt/hdd in linux but i cannot copy to it (is this because it only mounts the partition as read only ?)

    what can i do to get that file on the /system32 directory without reinstalling windows ?

  2. #2
    Linux Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    San Antonio
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    621
    recompile your kernel with NTFS write support, which is super-dangerous. But then again, if you weren't up for danger you wouldn't have deleted a file from your system32 folder.
    I respectfully decline the invitation to join your delusion.

  3. #3
    Linux Engineer
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    Jan 2003
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    Lebanon, pa
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    994
    If you copy to ntfs, 95% chance your going to screw up the fs on it but I guess you can try if you want.

  4. #4
    Linux Guru
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    Oct 2001
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    Täby, Sweden
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    7,578
    You actually scared me, wassy! Before I read the ", which is super-dangerous" part, I thought you had either gone crazy or were actually trying to ruin this poor man's Windows partition (not that it would hurt that much, now that I think of it more closely).

    Anyway, let me explain this to you in more detail, ICeMaN: How NTFS actually works is a secret that is closely guarded by Microsoft. Therefore, everything having to do with it has to be reverse-engineered, which is what has been done with NTFS support for Linux. Read support is possible since it's not that hard to accomplish. You can leave out some things and not really know what some other things are and still read the file. To do write support, though, you need to know what every last byte on the partition does, since you have to update it all so that it looks right. That's why you're almost certain to ruin your NTFS partition forever if you try the Linux NTFS module with write support on it.

  5. #5
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Swansea (UK)
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    221
    by the way wassy don't assume things unless you know of its truthfulness..... i didn't delete the file... it became corrupt while i will making my dual boot..... check you facts before you type

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