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Having installed various distros on various machines in my effort to find "the right one for me" I am still undecided! Suse appears very user friendly to GUI folk like ...
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  1. #1
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    Viewing files on the windows partition


    Having installed various distros on various machines in my effort to find "the right one for me" I am still undecided!

    Suse appears very user friendly to GUI folk like me but apparently the filesystem is not as pure as in other distros. It does some really nice stuff like putting an icon pointing at your windows partition on the desktop.

    Fedora doesn't do this so my son set it up for me but unfortunately I get...

    "You do not have the permissions necessary to view the contents of "windows"."

    What's the fix?

    Thanks,

    Ian

  2. #2
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    That depends on the setup. If you post the contents of your /etc/fstab file, I'm sure that I or someone else can post a suggestion.

  3. #3
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    fstab contents

    Thanks Dolda, here you go:

    LABEL=/ / ext3 defaults 1 1
    none /dev/pts devpts gid=5,mode=620 0 0
    none /proc proc defaults 0 0
    none /dev/shm tmpfs defaults 0 0
    /dev/hda3 swap swap defaults 0 0
    /dev/cdrom /mnt/cdrom udf,iso9660 noauto,owner,kudzu,ro 0 0

    /dev/hda1 /windows ntfs ro,users,noauto 0 0

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  5. #4
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    The replacing that last line with this:
    Code:
    /dev/hda1 /windows ntfs ro,users,noauto,umask=222 0 0
    Then remount the partition and see if it works.

  6. #5
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    No joy

    Did that, still get the same error message.

    Folder owner remains root and group remains root and permissions are r--r----x (441) and it doesn't seem to matter what I do at the command line in chgrp or chmod these default back when the partition is remounted.

    the mtab entry is:

    /dev/hda1 /windows ntfs ro,noexec,nosuid,nodev,umask=222 0 0

    not that I know what all that means

    Ian

  7. #6
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    I'm not sure about this, but seeing how the permissions that you have precisely matches the umask of 222 if taken as a decimal number, it leads me to believe that it might work if you set the umask=146 instead (146 in decimal form is 222 in octal form).

    It does seem strange to me that it would parse the umask as a decimal number, but it seems to be what it has done. At least try 146 instead of 222 and see if that helps.

    To learn what all the mount options and everything means, check out the manpages for fstab and mount.

  8. #7
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    I believe I'm in a similar situation...I just installed Fedora Core 1 and I've mounted my second drive, which has XP on it so I could retrieve the files I need and after that, proceed to wipe the drive and format it with Fedora... If I were to alter the last line of my /etc/fstab with that thing you suggestged, Dolda, would that allow me the permissions I'd need to do this?

  9. #8
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    You should not alter the line if it's not already related to the Windows filesystem. Instead, you should add another line for that mount. You also need the NTFS driver if you don't already have it:
    http://linux-ntfs.sf.net/

  10. #9
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    Perhaps I should start from the beginnning since the Linux file system and the concept of mount are both a bit confusing for me... That and not all of the explainations I'm getting seem to agree with one another... But anyway, I've downloaded and installed the NTFS driver. From there, what should I do to make it so that I can get files off of my NTFS drive and do with them whatever please?

  11. #10
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    I guess I should try to explain a bit how it works. In this area, you have three basic concepts: devices, partitions and filesystems.
    A device is a physical hard drive in your computer. A device basically stores a large number of sectors. IDE hard drives has sectors that are 512 bytes each. Linux represents IDE devices as files named /dev/hda, /dev/hdb, /dev/hdc and so on. DOS and Windows has no representation for devices.
    Each device is divided into a number of partitions. Partitions exist only in software - the first sector of the device (the MBR - Master Boot Record) contains the partition table that defines the partitions. Thus, a partition is a part of the hard drive. At first, the IBM PC specification specified that there can be at most four partitions per hard drive; these are now called the primary partitions of the hard drive. To overcome this limitation, one of the partitions can be specified to be an extended partition, which in turn can hold an arbitrary number of logical partitions. In Linux, the primary partitions on /dev/hda would be /dev/hda1, /dev/hda2, /dev/hda3 and /dev/hda4. All logical partitions will be /dev/hda5 an upwards, regardlessly of whether all primary partitions are in use or not. DOS and Windows has no representation for partitions, either, except when using FDISK to create them.

    A filesystem is a bunch of data, that represents files. They are usually stored on partitions, but need not be. A filesystem can be contained in another file, for example, but that's not common practice (although there are examples of this, too, like initrd's in Linux and ISO images). Windows represents filesystems as C:, D: and so on, in the order that it finds them (Win2k an later uses a scheme that is slightly more advanced, but it's normally set up to mimic the behavior of older MS systems).
    Linux has no distinct representation of individual filesystems like that. It has one big filetree. When the system boots, the kernel automatically mounts the filesystem that can be found on the partition specified by the boot loader on the root directory (/). This filesystem is therefore commonly referred to as the root filesystem, and the partition on which it resides as the root partition. When the system is up and running, you can mount other filesystems on directories in the file tree. The directories on which filesystems are mounted are called `mount points', but there is nothing special about them - they are just ordinary directories to begin with. To mount a filesystem, you usually use the mount command. You give it the filename that represents the device on which the filesystem that you want to mount resides, and the directory which is to be the mount point for the filesystem, like this for example:
    Code:
    mount /dev/hdb3 /mnt/somefs
    That would mount the filesystem on the third primary partition of the second IDE drive onto /mnt/somefs. That means that the filesystem's contents is accessible under /mnt/somefs. You can also say that it links /mnt/somefs to the root directory of the filesystem on /dev/hdb3.

    All in all, to access your Windows file system, you need to know what partition it is on. You can use the `fdisk -l' command to list all partitions on a device. For example, `fdisk -l /dev/hda' will list all partitions on /dev/hda. Then, if your Windows partition is /dev/hda1, for example, you would use this command to access it:
    Code:
    mount /dev/hda1 /mnt/windows
    That provides that you have a directory called /mnt/windows, of course. If you don't have it already, you can either mount the filesystem somewhere else, or create /mnt/windows with the `mkdir' command.
    The mount command usually manages to autodetect what filesystem type is on the partition. Sometimes it fails to do so, though, and you will have to specify it manually with the -t switch, like this:
    Code:
    mount -t ntfs /dev/hda1 /mnt/windows
    To see what filesystem drivers are currently registered with the kernel, run this command:
    Code:
    cat /proc/filesystems
    I hope that clears it up a bit.

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