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Currently, I have Ubuntu running on a USB harddrive while my Window's hard drive is in my machine via IDE. My problem is, Ubuntu can see the drive and it's ...
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  1. #1
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    Windows HDD won't mount


    Currently, I have Ubuntu running on a USB harddrive while my Window's hard drive is in my machine via IDE. My problem is, Ubuntu can see the drive and it's partitions, as well as capacities, however it doesn't feel like mounting it. I get the error:

    Code:
    error: device /dev/hda3 is not removable
    error: could not execute pmount
    Any help or explaination? This isn't critical, but I definately would like to be able to access my art and media stored on that drive...

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer rcgreen's Avatar
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    post your /etc/fstab file and let's see

  3. #3
    Linux User ImNeat's Avatar
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    Is your windows partition ntfs? If so - while you can view and sometimes write to it from linux, it's a frowned-upon practice. Writing to ntfs from linux is a nice way to bust up the partition. You'd be best to make a 3rd fat32 partition to share between linux & windows.
    10" Sony Vaio SRX99P 850MHz P3-M 256MB RAM 20GB HD : ArchLinux
    14" Dell Inspiron 1420N 2GHz Core2Duo 2GB RAM 160GB HD : Xubuntu

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    Well, all I wish to be able to do is read from that drive. It's got all my music, which I would much enjoy having while using Linux. Anyway, the fstab reads this:
    Code:
    # /etc/fstab: static file system information.
    #
    # <file system> <mount point>   <type>  <options>       <dump>  <pass>
    proc            /proc           proc    defaults        0       0
    /dev/sda3       /               ext3    defaults,errors=remount-ro 0       1
    /dev/sda5       none            swap    sw              0       0
    /dev/hdc        /media/cdrom0   udf,iso9660 user,noauto     0       0

  5. #5
    Linux Guru antidrugue's Avatar
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    Can you post the output of
    Code:
    fdisk -l
    ?
    "To express yourself in freedom, you must die to everything of yesterday. From the 'old', you derive security; from the 'new', you gain the flow."

    -Bruce Lee

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    Code:
    Disk /dev/sda: 20.5 GB, 20547841536 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 2498 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sda1               1         784     6297448+  83  Linux
    /dev/sda2             785         915     1052257+  82  Linux swap / Solaris
    /dev/sda3   *         916        2429    12161205   83  Linux
    /dev/sda4            2430        2498      554242+   5  Extended
    /dev/sda5            2430        2498      554211   82  Linux swap / Solaris
    
    Disk /dev/sdb: 127 MB, 127926272 bytes
    4 heads, 61 sectors/track, 1024 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 244 * 512 = 124928 bytes
    
    This doesn't look like a partition table
    Probably you selected the wrong device.
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sdb1   ?     3189082     7867400   570754815+  72  Unknown
    Partition 1 has different physical/logical beginnings (non-Linux?):
         phys=(357, 116, 40) logical=(3189081, 2, 23)
    Partition 1 has different physical/logical endings:
         phys=(357, 32, 45) logical=(7867399, 2, 61)
    Partition 1 does not end on cylinder boundary.
    /dev/sdb2   ?      691351     8625893   968014120   65  Novell Netware 386
    Partition 2 has different physical/logical beginnings (non-Linux?):
         phys=(288, 115, 43) logical=(691350, 2, 1)
    Partition 2 has different physical/logical endings:
         phys=(367, 114, 50) logical=(8625892, 1, 53)
    Partition 2 does not end on cylinder boundary.
    /dev/sdb3   ?     7663449    15597991   968014096   79  Unknown
    Partition 3 has different physical/logical beginnings (non-Linux?):
         phys=(366, 32, 33) logical=(7663448, 2, 32)
    Partition 3 has different physical/logical endings:
         phys=(357, 32, 43) logical=(15597990, 1, 36)
    Partition 3 does not end on cylinder boundary.
    /dev/sdb4   ?    11826563    11826790       27749+   d  Unknown
    Partition 4 has different physical/logical beginnings (non-Linux?):
         phys=(372, 97, 50) logical=(11826562, 0, 25)
    Partition 4 has different physical/logical endings:
         phys=(0, 10, 0) logical=(11826789, 2, 13)
    Partition 4 does not end on cylinder boundary.
    
    Partition table entries are not in disk order

  7. #7
    Linux Guru antidrugue's Avatar
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    As root
    Code:
    su
    just type the command
    Code:
    fdisk -l
    in the terminal or console.

    EDIT: ok you got it.
    "To express yourself in freedom, you must die to everything of yesterday. From the 'old', you derive security; from the 'new', you gain the flow."

    -Bruce Lee

  8. #8
    Linux Guru antidrugue's Avatar
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    And what about
    Code:
    fdisk -l /dev/hda
    ?
    "To express yourself in freedom, you must die to everything of yesterday. From the 'old', you derive security; from the 'new', you gain the flow."

    -Bruce Lee

  9. #9
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    Code:
    Disk /dev/hda: 200.0 GB, 200049647616 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 24321 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/hda1   *           1        7939    63769986    7  HPFS/NTFS
    /dev/hda3            7940       24321   131588415    7  HPFS/NTFS

  10. #10
    Linux Guru antidrugue's Avatar
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    Check out this thread on how to add an entry in your /etc/fstab file :
    http://www.linuxforums.org/forum/sus...e-help-me.html

    The mount point must exist. Then you can mount the content of /etc/fstab like that:
    Code:
    mount -a
    If you just want to mount it once, you can do it like that :
    Code:
    mount -t ntfs -o umask=0222,user /dev/hda1 /mnt/windows1
    The directory /mnt/windows1 must exist.

    You can replace /dev/hda1 with /dev/hda3 for the other partition, and /mnt/windows1 for any destination you may choose.
    "To express yourself in freedom, you must die to everything of yesterday. From the 'old', you derive security; from the 'new', you gain the flow."

    -Bruce Lee

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