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OK, it looks like testdisk is correctly finding your partitions and marking them as deleted. You can actually change that, use the up and down arrows to select a partition ...
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  1. #21
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    OK, it looks like testdisk is correctly finding your partitions and marking them as deleted. You can actually change that, use the up and down arrows to select a partition in testdisk, and use the left and right arrow keys to change the setting from D (which means the partition was deleted and should not be restored) to, ah, I don't remember Oh well, basically there are two settings that sound like they'll restore the partition: bootable, and something else. For recovery purposes, don't bother with bootable, use the other. Then see what shows up.

    And I'd just use cp. If you use the a and x flags, it will copy the entire filesystem restricted to that partition. It should look like cp -ax [old drive] [new drive]

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by attilathepun
    OK, it looks like testdisk is correctly finding your partitions and marking them as deleted. You can actually change that, use the up and down arrows to select a partition in testdisk, and use the left and right arrow keys to change the setting from D
    I had actually tried that. Unfortunately, testdrive won't allow me to change any of the deleted partitions to - for example - primary. The main linux partition just said "file system corrupt, no files. (Not true - see below). The other linux partitions looked like older ones that must have been partially over-written either end and testdisk just reports any choice other than deleted as "bad structure". The one partition I was able to recover complete was a FAT 32 (ho! ho!) but this turned out to be a backup of my /home files from last year which I had also backed up to another computer. See - I was actually not as stupid as this error would suggest

    So - really - I was no further forward with testdisk. It looked very promising and maybe in the hands of someone with more experience he/she might have been able to get something off the disk. I actually ended up with nothing from the last few months of data. It was data from this period that I need to recover. It is my /home directories I had just backed up to the damaged partition last week.

    Anyway - I then turned to "Foremost". This turns out to be a nifty piece of software and something that even an idiot like me can understand. I ran it on the copy of the damaged disk and it promptly found and copied to my second hard disk some 70,000 files!! Of course most of it is cr*p - like over 7000 *.png files. But in there somewhere turned out to be several hundred photos most of which copied over intact. The files are all sub-divided by extentions but unfortunately I have lost the partition and folder structure. The files are all just numbered as in "12345678.jpg", with the same date on each (the recovery date). So no indication what the content is or the creation/modification date.

    Now I am into forensic mode really - just opening file after file in the hope of retreiving important documents like my tax returns and some photos that are still missing.

    Anyway - at least I feel i am making progress. I am still in the hunt for the correct dd command to make an img file as opposed to a copy of the disk content. No help from anyone yet.

    Thanks for the continued interest. BTW do you have an idea of what software I might use (e.g. a viewer) that would enable me to look quickly at text and doc files without having to open them as I have to in open office etc. I have 5,000 files to look through - most are just rubbish...

    Also - I need to search using foremost for some file extensions that it doesn't appear to look for - e.g. *.mbs which is what Opera keeps email in (I am missing 6 months of emails), and *.adr files which is where Opera keeps my contact list. Anyone know how to get Foremost to search for other extensions (the default has it search for a set of known extensions only).


    Cheers

    Richard

  3. #23
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    Did you try the recover from suse10? try the repair installation in cd-1 if it recognize your partitions you'll be up and running. (with suse10) It fix and recognize my partitions after a bad installation of windows nt. most of my data was ok.

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  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Linux_user1
    Did you try the recover from suse10? try the repair installation in cd-1 if it recognize your partitions you'll be up and running. (with suse10) It fix and recognize my partitions after a bad installation of windows nt. most of my data was ok.
    Thanks for the tip. Actually, my partitions were too far gone for anything much to recognise them.

    I have now abandoned any further efforts to recover material from the damaged disk. I did get a few photos and documents back but, really, I did not have to ability to recover stuff that needed more of a forensic approach.

    I used foremost and recovered 87,000 files would you believe!! However it was mostly rubbish - for example over 1000 *png files . Not much use. I also got thousands of documents but the way foremost recovers them is not helpful either. It just gives them a number prefix and the creation date appears to be lost. I can't find a document preview program for linux and I am not going to open several thousand documents in openoffice in the hope that I can find the 30-40 or so that were created after my last back up.

    Finally, the really important (to me) extensions aren't recovered by foremost - for example *adr and *mbs files from the opera email browser (unless anyone knows different). I have kept the backed up recovered files, but no longer have the original copy of the damaged disk (a 250 Gb disk that I needed to have back in business).

    Anyway - a big thank you to all those who helped me this far - hope you are still subscribed attilathepun.

    Regards

    Richard

  6. #25
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    Hehe, I'm still here, but I don't think I can be much more help
    Most of my knowledge about data recovery comes from experience; I, like you, have unintentionally destroyed my partition table, only I've done it several times:
    Once when I first started with Linux. That was also the first time I did much partitioning, so it was a fairly fresh disk and I managed to recover easily.
    Twice on an old laptop that I was playing with just for fun (I mean a REALLY old machine). Those times I didn't need to recover, since the disk held no useful data, but I did anyway.
    Once recently, when a Gentoo install went foul. I recovered all my data and my other Linux install, but my Windows install was gone.

    So I try and help others. Recently, though, my Windows partition quit working for no apparent reason (It'd boot, but the wcc had been corrupted somehow and I couldn't load any programs), so I'm trying to redo things so I don't need Windows anymore. Between other software and Wine, I'm coming a long way, and maybe I can get rid of Windows altogether.

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