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is there any way i can change the moun t command's permitions so as to allow users to use the -t flag eg: Code: mount -t vfat /dev/fd0 /mnt/floppy that ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Newbie easuter's Avatar
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    mount -t command for users


    is there any way i can change the mount command's permitions so as to allow users to use the -t flag

    eg:

    Code:
    mount -t vfat /dev/fd0 /mnt/floppy
    that only works as root, and i need to use it as a regular user.

    so other than changing permissions (not sure if thats possible), is it possible to create a sudo group?
    how would i go about creating a sudo group for this command?

    thanks in advance
    All Empires rise and fall. The Microsoft Empire has already risen, only one way to go now...

  2. #2
    Linux Newbie easuter's Avatar
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    anyone at all?
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  3. #3
    Linux Engineer Zelmo's Avatar
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    Maybe the best way to do it is to make an entry in /etc/fstab that includes the "user" or "users" option.
    For example, here's a section of my fstab that lets any user mount/unmount my USB flash key and its integrated flash card reader:
    Code:
    # <file system> <mount point>   <type>  <options>       <dump>  <pass>
    
    # Flash drive/card reader (assumes they're sda and sdb)
    /dev/sda1       /media/flash    auto    rw,sync,users   0       0
    /dev/sdb1       /media/8in1     auto    rw,sync,users   0       0
    With something like that in place, any user can mount either device from the command line. The -t option doesn't need to be included in the mount command because the filesystem type is specified in the fstab.
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  4. #4
    Linux Newbie easuter's Avatar
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    hm, i have edited fstab but it doesnt suit my needs.
    i'm making mount and unmount scripts for my parallel port zip100 drive, and there are a few minor anoyances that fstab doesnt fix for me:

    1 - if the zip disk is not inserted at boot, then only the drive is listed in /dev (/dev/sda)
    2 - i need to use /sbin/partprobe to update the /dev dir so that it can "see" the disk in the drive after i put it in (then becomes /dev/sda4)
    3 - if there are any other external devices that use scsi emulation (all pendrives and external hard-drives) mounted before the zip-drive gets mounted, then the zip drive becomes /dev/sdx4

    so by making my own mount script in which partprobe is run and the script attemps to mount multiple /dev/sdx drives until it gets the right one, my problem gets solved.

    thats why i'm not using fstab...
    All Empires rise and fall. The Microsoft Empire has already risen, only one way to go now...

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