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Hi All, I just wanted to know that whether we have these 2 below mentioned features in linux : 1. Roaming Profiles for users. 2. Terminal Services Client . We ...
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  1. #1
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    Terminal Services and Roaming Profiles


    Hi All,
    I just wanted to know that whether we have these 2 below mentioned features in linux :

    1. Roaming Profiles for users.
    2. Terminal Services Client .

    We have these two great features in WIndows 2000
    Do we have them in Linux also any version or any distribution.

    Thanks in Advance

  2. #2
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    Please? UNIX had these features long before Windows even existed! =)

    To get distributed profiles, there are two parts that you need to set up:
    First, you need a remote authentication mechanism. Common ones are NIS and Kerberos. NIS is quick and easy to set up, while Kerberos is very secure.
    Then you need to share the home directories over all systems in the network, since UNIX programs store settings in the users' home directory. The only real way to do that is to use a network file system, such NFS (which actually stands for network file system).

    Terminal services is the real strength of UNIX. In the beginning of UNIX there were only terminals, so one might say that UNIX is prepared for that.
    For text terminal applications it's no match at all, just use telnet, ssh, rsh, rexec or whatever. ssh is by far the most secure.
    For X applications it takes some effort to set it up in a flawless way, since many configurations are meant to be local, but it's all about settings, since the X protocol is network transparent. As you may or may not know, X applications decide what X server to connect to using the DISPLAY environment variable, which is usually set to ":0", indicating the local X server running at display 0. If you set it to "computer:0", X applications will instead connect to display 0 on the computer identified by "computer". Instead the Windows' crude virtual frame buffer solution, this allows for true distributed computing, since if you use a computer as a terminal, you can start applications on three different servers making them display their output on the terminal, and they will open windows on the terminal just if they were running locally.
    Virtually everything in UNIX is network transparent, so most things can be done in a distributed manner, not just displaying output.

  3. #3
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    also terminal services into windows machines is supported through the use of rdesktop. So you could have a windows desktop server (don't know why you would want a windows server though) and just have a bunch of dumb linux thin clients using rdesktop to run off of that server. I don't know if Windows has an ssh server. I assume it does though. Not sure what it would be good for, but then again I am not a command line guy with windows. They have virtually no TUI apps.
    I respectfully decline the invitation to join your delusion.

  4. #4
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    Unix had "terminal services" since 1969.

  5. #5
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    UNICS, if I may. =)

  6. #6
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    Well it was only called that for a very short period of time.

  7. #7
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    Yeah, I know... I think it was even called UNIX in '69. Thompson probably changed it before he released it to public, I just think it's a fun thing.

  8. #8
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    UNICS looks way too much like EUNICHS. We geeks get enough of a hard time without using OSes named after castrated males.

  9. #9
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    it was called UNICS, but they couldn't store file names that were over 4 letters on the first systems, so it was called UNIX for short.
    I respectfully decline the invitation to join your delusion.

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