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I want to make a user identical to "root", or I can say in this cloning age I too want to create a clone of superuser that is "root". Any ...
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  1. #1
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    root's clone


    I want to make a user identical to "root", or I can say in this cloning age I too want to create a clone of superuser that is "root".

    Any clue...

  2. #2
    Linux Guru sarumont's Avatar
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    What type of clone? Do you want this cloned user to have all the access that root has? If so, what is the point? Are there any differences in "root2" and root? Please specify a little more.
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  3. #3
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    In the /etc/passwd, change the uid of karunesh to '0'
    And the user karunesh will have the same power as that of root.
    You are the one Linux!

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  5. #4
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    i don' think you can do that dude! you could have your regular user have the same superuser rights as root, but not like changing it to '0'. that's reserved only for root.. .
    Registered User #345074

  6. #5
    Linux Engineer Giro's Avatar
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    Yeh you can only have one super user thats the way the OS is!!

  7. #6
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    if you are looking for normal users to have same power as root in terms of commands

    try,
    # man sudo
    # man sudoers
    # visudo

    normal users can issue root commands by typing
    # sudo command

  8. #7
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    I set my UID to 0 just to try and see if it would take and it did with no problems. I was able to do it in SuSE and Redhat, but then again this was like 3 - 4 years ago when I was able to do this.

  9. #8
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    you can set the uid to 0 but that's not a good practice

  10. #9
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    so what happened Darrant, you had like 2 roots? will the system allow that? aren't IDs supposed to be unique? that's like a sure breach of security protocol there! or a bug. ain't it?

    Registered User #345074

  11. #10
    Linux Newbie
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    I dont see any problem in setting my UID to 0.
    What else do i need if i want root's power?
    You are the one Linux!

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