Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 3 of 3
Now that I have a working Arch install, I wanted to share /home between it and my Fedora install. So, I decided to dedicate /dev/sda3 to /home. It's about 40GB. ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Linux Engineer Thrillhouse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Arlington, VA, USA
    Posts
    1,377

    Sharing /home between distros


    Now that I have a working Arch install, I wanted to share /home between it and my Fedora install. So, I decided to dedicate /dev/sda3 to /home. It's about 40GB. I have it set up correctly on both systems. df -h verifies that when I log in. The problem is, if I switch distros (shut one down and boot the other) before I log in I have to run
    Code:
    $chown -R username:username username
    to log in graphically. The reason is I get this error when I try to log in
    User's $HOME/.dmrc file is being ignored. This prevents the default session and language from being saved. File should be owned by user and have 644 permissions. User's $HOME directory must be owned by user and not writeable by any other users.
    I then have to switch to runlevel 3, run the chown command and restart the X server. I'm not sure why this is happening, the username is the same for both distros. I'm thinking that it might have something to do with the two distros /etc/passwd or /etc/shadow files being different but I didn't want to start messing with those without knowing what I was doing so if anybody has any advice, I'd be glad to hear it.

  2. #2
    Blackfooted Penguin daark.child's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    West Yorks
    Posts
    4,393
    Are you using the same uid and gid for each account e.g. if your uid in Fedora is 500 and gid is 500, then you have to make sure its the same for your account in Arch. Some distros give normal users uids and gids that start from 1000, so this can cause some problems when sharing /home directories with distros like FC which have uids and gids that start at 500. Also some distros use a private group for each user whereas some put all users in one group so its something to look out for.

  3. #3
    Linux Engineer Thrillhouse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Arlington, VA, USA
    Posts
    1,377
    Aha! That was it. Fedora had the UID and GID set to 500 and Arch had them at 1002. Thanks daark.child.

  4. $spacer_open
    $spacer_close

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •