First off, you will have to download some software and have a little bit of fun trying to get it all to work:

I used this site to get them and get some help configuring the parts and pieces: Linux.com :: Syncing your BlackBerry on Linux

Now then, the parts and pieces.

You will need to add in these source files into the repositories:
Code:
echo 'deb http://opensync.gforge.punktart.de/repo/opensync-0.21/ feisty main'  |  sudo tee -a /etc/apt/sources.list
echo 'deb-src http://opensync.gforge.punktart.de/repo/opensync-0.21/ feisty main'  |  sudo tee -a /etc/apt/sources.list
Then do:

Code:
sudo apt-get update
Now download the packages that are needed. I will just tell you how to do it with the synaptic. Just go and type in in 'opensync' and install all the packages that are '0.22-feisty'. I know, you are not supposed to mix the repos but this is the only way. Also, I recommend using kitchensync since it is much easier and nicer to use than the gui provided for msynctool.


Next, we need to make sure we have the libusb libraries:

Code:
sudo apt-get install libusb-0.1-4 libusb++-0.1-4c2 libusb-dev libusb++-dev
Next, download and install the following (I will post the universal ones (the kind that can be used on most Ubuntu varients):

SourceForge.net: Downloading ...

SourceForge.net: Downloading ...

SourceForge.net: Downloading ...

SourceForge.net: Downloading ...

SourceForge.net: Downloading ...

You must install the first link before you can install any of the others.


Since that is all out of the way, we need to get down to business. First off, you must find out the PIN number of your device. You can do that by simply going to terminal and typing after connecting your device:

Code:
btool -d 'Browser Folders'
It should give you a readout like this:
Code:
nathan@nathan-laptop:~$ btool -d 'Browser Folders'
Blackberry devices found:
Device ID: 0x809ea00. PIN: 123ee774, Description: RIM 8100 Series Colour CDMA Handheld
Using device (PIN): 319ee762
Raw record dump for record: 8a17e602
    00000000: 06 00 26 00 40 02 44 01 01 00 02 e6 17 8a 00 14  ..&.@.D.........
    00000010: 00 00 81 d6 e2 b7 60 00 0d 57 41 50 20 42 6f 6f  ......`..WAP Boo
    00000020: 6b 6d 61 72 6b 73                                kmarks

Raw record dump for record: 2c692a88
    00000000: 06 00 2d 00 40 02 44 01 02 00 88 2a 69 2c 00 1b  ..-.@.D....*i,..
    00000010: 00 00 81 d6 e2 b7 60 00 14 42 6c 61 63 6b 42 65  ......`..BlackBe
    00000020: 72 72 79 20 42 6f 6f 6b 6d 61 72 6b 73           rry Bookmarks
Where it says 'PIN; Then a series of numbers in HEX (ex: 123ee774). That is your PIN. Next, lets make a backup of your blackberry shall we? Go to terminal and type the following while your blackberry is plugged into your computer:

Code:
barrybackup
You will get a window that looks like below:



It should see your device and put the pin in automatically, if not, just enter in your PIN, and click 'backup'. You can put this just about anywhere you want. just got to configure it. I will let you figure it out since it is rather straight forward.

Next, lets setup msynctool. Just type in the following:

Code:
msynctool --addgroup Blackberry
msynctool --addmember Blackberry barry-sync
msynctool --addmember Blackberry file-sync
msynctool --showgroup Blackberry
This will get that up and going but it still needs to be configured for it to sync.

Do the following to do that:

Code:
msynctool --configure Blackberry 1
The 1 stands for the first 'member' that you added, which will be the barry-sync. You will get something like this. The here you see '319ee762' that is where you put your PIN (again) and you are set (well, if you have a password, add that into by how it says, if not, remove it completely). Next, we want to set up the file-sync:


Code:
msynctool --configure Blackberry 2
You should get something like this:

Code:
<config><path>Path_to_where_you_want_your_stuff_to_go</path><recursive>FALSE</recursive></co$
There, now you are ready to go. Have fun and feel free to experiment. Also, feel free to give me feedback on anything I need to fix or add.


I give thanks to Joe Barr who created that article.

Note, this can be modified to work on fedora as well.