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I am extremely frustrated I have a Palm TX handheld and have attempted to sync it with jpilot and kpilot. nevertheless I dont know how to get it to work. ...
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  1. #1
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    How to sync palm device that uses USB with linux


    I am extremely frustrated I have a Palm TX handheld and have attempted to sync it with jpilot and kpilot. nevertheless I dont know how to get it to work.

    can anyone tell me how I can do this?? I just want to sync the TX with either of these programs.

    Please tell me step by step.


    by the way I have SUSE 9.3

  2. #2
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    Make sure that /dev/pilot is linked to /dev/ttyUSB0.

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    how do I do that??

    do I type /dev/pilot/dev/ttyUSB0 ???

    please demonstrate for me.

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    Linux Engineer Zelmo's Avatar
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    udev will automatically make a /dev/pilot entry when it detects the device. Because of that, you have to push the Hot-Sync button on the device first, then have KPilot sync with it (I haven't had much luck with any software other than KPilot).

    The timing can be tricky, because you have to wait long enough that udev makes the /dev/pilot entry, but if you wait too long then the sync times out. It took me two or three tries last time I did it, but then it worked great.
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    so what you are saying is that I should not change the dev/pilot/ setting and just time the pushing of the sync button on the device and the sync button in kpilot??

    or do I type udev instead of /dev/pilot?

  7. #6
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    In Kpilot this is the error message that I get whenever I try to sync by using the default

    /dev/pilot/

    I think kpilot is trying to communicate with the Palm TX beacuse it gives the following message:

    18:11:19 Next HotSync will be: HotSync. Please press the HotSync button.
    18:11:32 Next HotSync will be: HotSync. Please press the HotSync button.
    18:11:32 Pilot device /dev/pilot/ is not read-write.
    18:11:32 Next HotSync will be: HotSync. Please press the HotSync button.
    18:11:33 Trying to open device /dev/pilot/...
    18:11:33 Could not open device: /dev/pilot/ (will retry)

  8. #7
    Linux Engineer Zelmo's Avatar
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    What are the permissions on /dev/pilot? (Check with ls -l /dev/pilot)
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    ok I typed the command that you asked me to execute and this is what I got:

    while on normal user:

    Code:
     chacmool@linux:~> ls -l /dev/pilot
    total 0
    while being root user:

    Code:
     linux:/home/chacmool # chacmool@linux:~> ls -l /dev/pilot
    bash: chacmool@linux:~: command not found
    linux:/home/chacmool # total 0
    bash: total: command not found
    linux:/home/chacmool #

  10. #9
    Linux Engineer Zelmo's Avatar
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    Right, you have to do it while the device node exists (after you hit the hot-sync button, but before the Palm Pilot turns off). udev will erase the /dev/pilot entry once it looks like the Palm Pilot has disconnected, which is any time it's not turned on.

    I'm going to go out on a limb here, and guess that the result will be something like rw-rw----, since udev defaults to those permissions. In that case, there are three ways to give you permission to access the device:

    1. Note the group that /dev/pilot belongs to, and make yourself part of that group. To do so, edit /etc/group as root. Find the line in that file that starts with the group name you noted as belonging to /dev/pilot, and add your user name to the end of that line. That will make you part of that group, and you then have access to /dev/pilot. There may be a GUI way to do the same thing, depending on your distro and/or desktop environment. But this way works for everyone, regardless.

    2. Alter your udev rules so that the group assigned to /dev/pilot is one you already belong to. To see which groups you're already in, type groups at a command prompt. Pick one that sounds appropriate, then edit your /etc/udev/rules.d/udev.rules (or /etc/udev/rules.d/50-udev.rules as the case may be) as root, find the line that contains SYMLINK+="pilot", and add GROUP="<whatever>" to the end (where <whatever> is the group name you picked out). The next time you press hot-sync (and every subsequent time), /dev/pilot will belong to the group you specified, so you'll have full read/write access to it.

    3. Alter your udev rules so that everyone has access to /dev/pilot. Edit your /etc/udev/rules.d/udev.rules (or /etc/udev/rules.d/50-udev.rules as the case may be) as root, find the line that contains SYMLINK+="pilot", and add MODE="0666" to the end.

    If you're on a personal computer, it doesn't much matter which method you use. The first one is probably the easiest.
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    Ok how can I find out what group dev/pilot/ is in? any suggestions?

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