Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 7 of 7
Hi, I'd like to setup an old computer (either a 200mhz 128mb or a 133Mhz 32mb) as a wireless acess point. The access point is aimed at long distance connections ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    9

    Question Linux Wireless Access Point / Router / Firewall


    Hi,

    I'd like to setup an old computer (either a 200mhz 128mb or a 133Mhz 32mb) as a wireless acess point.

    The access point is aimed at long distance connections and thus the computer will be put on top of a highpoint as dedicated ap / router / firewall.

    This is a private wireless network which will consist at most of only 10 users so I think both computers provide ample processing power.

    Now the questions:
    1) Which distribution do I use? I understand that debian based distributions are the most stable which you want with a computer that you will only be able to access remotely. It's a big thing to get access to the highsite everytime something breaks. But what for instance is the difference between using Debian and Ubuntu-server?

    2) Can I use the 32mb RAM system? Naturally the faster can't go wrong, but if I use the faster one I'd eventually want to use the slower one on another highsite. Would it even be possible to install debian on a system with 32mb RAM? This again depends on which distribution I use, as far as I could see DSL is the only way to install debian on such low end systems (<32mb Ram).

    3) So...What about DSLinux. I understand that it can run on 16mb RAM, but what does it have, or not have, that makes it run on such low memory? Would it be a suitable platform for an AP / router?

    4) Any other conciderations / advice ?

  2. #2
    Linux Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    682
    I would expect you to be able to set up an access point with only 32MB of ram. I use a Linksys WRT54G with openwrt on it and it works perfectly with less ram than that.

    The only thing I'd add is check your wireless hardware before you start, the ability to act as an access point is a feature of the card you end up using. Check the supported drivers list on the hostapd page.

    Good luck, and let us know how you get on,

    Chris...
    To be good, you must first be bad. "Newbie" is a rank, not a slight.

  3. #3
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    9
    Of course! I never even thought about the possibility of OpenWRT having an x86 version.

    I'll put that on the 32mb RAM pc .

    I haven't bought any wireless hardware, so I'll make sure I get something compatible. At this stage I was thinking about a card based on the atheros chipset. Is their better support for the prism54 chipsets? Would it make a difference which I choose.

    I'll let you know how things develop. I have a few exams left but then I can start working on this fulltime.

    THanks

  4. $spacer_open
    $spacer_close
  5. #4
    Linux Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    682
    I'm not sure I can give a useful suggestion on hardware.

    I've set up an AP with an Atheros card and although the drivers had lots of promise, the card itself didn't support WPA so I wrote it off. This was some time ago and if you select a decent card rather than the cheapest thing off ebay then I would expect you to have more luck.

    As I understand it, Prism54 is well supported too, but I've never used one myself.

    I don't think there would be anything to choose between one chipset and the other just as long as you can set up the AP with it.

    Looking forward to hearing how it goes,

    Chris...
    To be good, you must first be bad. "Newbie" is a rank, not a slight.

  6. #5
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    9
    well the problem now is how do I install openwrt? I figured I needed the x86 image file from the website and dd that to the harddrive i want to install openwrt on.

    That works but it only creates a folder boot with grub inside, where's the rest of openwrt? Did I miss something?

  7. #6
    Linux Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    682
    I've never tried to use the x86 version of openWRT, but there are instructions here. Check these out and if you get stuck anywhere we will try to help.

    Let us know how you get on,

    Chris...
    To be good, you must first be bad. "Newbie" is a rank, not a slight.

  8. #7
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    9

    Talking

    Well, I've figured it'll be a lot of work to install openwrt without any added benefit (that I'm aware of) and I did get debian 4.0 to install on 32mb RAM system even though the debian installation guide listed 48mb as minimum.

    So now I have a working debian server

    Thanks for all the input though. The battle is long not over since I have a rather complicated network structure. But i think it's best to post those questions in another post.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •