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If we have one F&P server on the network it must be powered on all the time or at least on when the network devices (switch, router) are on (soI ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined! roger's Avatar
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    Dual server on network


    If we have one F&P server on the network it must be powered on all the time or at least on when the network devices (switch, router) are on (soI will put it in the same cabinet). What arrangements (software/hardware) do I need to configure a fail safe arrangement e.g. put another Linux server in place? Or maybe there is another way of keeping the server 100% available?

  2. #2
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    100% available? For a print server? Awww c'mon. How long would it take you to set up another print server on commodity hardware? An hour?

    You might want to use a UPS, and even set up an identical failover box which can be turned on in the case of catastrophic failure on the main print server.

    But the biggest problem you'll face is power outage. If that happens, the printers will be offline, as will the switch/hub. At that point it's useless to keep the print server online too.

    My advice is forget it. There are much more important services that you can direct resources at to achieve 100% uptime than printing.
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    Just Joined! roger's Avatar
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    Agreed about Print Sharing. I am also thinking of File sharing and if users are editing files opened on the server although they will loose current edits then the file will be inaccessible. Is there a case for a UPS system protecting the server and associated network common hardware?

    I am a little unsure about file sharing. If a file is share is created on the server, say a Word document, when opened is it entirely uploaded to the windows workstation?

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    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    It's the same as if you use the file locally - the word processor loads the file off the network filesystem exactly as it would the local filesystem. It exists in memory until the word processor is closed. If some other user tries to edit the same file, you run into filesharing problems, but that's what setting up your network permissions is all about. Some files you'd want to let multiple people look at it at the same time, but you might want to restrict who can write to it. This is standard fare for a networked filesystem.
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    Just Joined! roger's Avatar
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    Thanks, yes and of course Word or OOo Writer will only allow the file to be opened during edit as read-only if I remember right.

    One issue about converting to a server (and I've not been able to find a tutorial about this), is the process of how to get existing folders and files onto the server (and to decide which ones) in a manner seamless to the users who don't want to get in one morning and discover their files are "missing".

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    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by roger View Post
    Thanks, yes and of course Word or OOo Writer will only allow the file to be opened during edit as read-only if I remember right.
    You remember wrong. Word and OOo should both obey the filesystem permissions and locking provided by the networked file system. This means that if a user with write permissions opens the file, they can change it and save it again provided the file is not locked by another user.

    Quote Originally Posted by roger View Post
    One issue about converting to a server (and I've not been able to find a tutorial about this), is the process of how to get existing folders and files onto the server (and to decide which ones) in a manner seamless to the users who don't want to get in one morning and discover their files are "missing".
    Ahhh... This is called "planning". If your users didn't have the server before, you could just set up the file system and ask them to organise their own documents.
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    Just Joined! roger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roxoff View Post
    You remember wrong. Word and OOo should both obey the filesystem permissions and locking provided by the networked file system. This means that if a user with write permissions opens the file, they can change it and save it again provided the file is not locked by another user.

    Ahhh... This is called "planning". If your users didn't have the server before, you could just set up the file system and ask them to organise their own documents.
    Yes, I was refering to a situation where a 2nd user opened the same file.

    Yes, I will trial one User and see if I can make this as easy as possible. Some of them really do not savvy PCs.

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