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Folks, For the past three days, I was running into a problem installing bind on Fedora 11. It turns out it was related to the Linksys router that I was ...
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  1. #1
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    Bind9 install - Some not so obvious tips


    Folks,

    For the past three days, I was running into a problem installing bind on Fedora 11. It turns out it was related to the Linksys router that I was using. However, I did get to learn a few things about Bind9 that are not that obvious. Thought I will pass this along for others.

    1. Get bind-chroot and NOT bind
    It seems the newer versions of Linux encourage bind-chroot. I was doing "yum install bind" until I came across a post that mentiond "yum install bind-chroot."

    2. Specify ROOTDIR in named
    Bind-Chroot install will create the directory structure /var/named/chroot. However, you still need to edit /etc/init.d/named and add the following:

    ROOTDIR="/var/named/chroot/"

    Strangely, this is not mentioned anywhere on the Internet.

    3. Don't modify /etc/resolv.conf
    All the docs say that you must modify /etc/resolv.conf and add the following:

    nameserver 127.0.0.1

    The problem is, under Fedora, NetworkManager recreates this file each time the box is rebooted. If you really want to preserve your info in between the boots,
    either disable NetworkManager or modify /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0 and add:

    DNS1=127.0.0.1
    DNS2=xx.xx.xx.xx

    Hope these tips help when you are building your DNS server.

    Regards,
    Peter

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Lazydog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterTaps View Post
    2. Specify ROOTDIR in named
    Bind-Chroot install will create the directory structure /var/named/chroot. However, you still need to edit /etc/init.d/named and add the following:

    ROOTDIR="/var/named/chroot/"

    Strangely, this is not mentioned anywhere on the Internet.
    You should not have to do this. If you have to then there is either a setup problem on your system or the package you DL is not setup correctly.

    I have been running chroot bind for years now and never had to make any changes to named startup script.

    Regards
    Robert

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