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Here's my setup. I have a CentOS 5.3 box running Samba and OpenVPN. I have the Samba server setup as a WINS server and OpenVPN pushes the WINS server to ...
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    OpenVPN + Samba Wins (weird ip address resolving)


    Here's my setup.

    I have a CentOS 5.3 box running Samba and OpenVPN. I have the Samba server setup as a WINS server and OpenVPN pushes the WINS server to clients when they connect. Everything is working great except for one problem. When I connect to the VPN using a Windows machine at a remote location, I can ping all the host names of computers on the VPN network no problem at all. However, when I ping the host name of the OpenVPN server it resolves to 192.168.122.1. All my machines are on a 10.x subnet and I have no idea where this ip is coming from. I've checked the hosts file, lmhosts, etc. and can find no reference to this 192.168.122 subnet.

    I think I recall seeing this 192.168.122.1 ip when I had installed the Virtualization group and it created a virtbr0 network bridge with that ip. I've since removed the Virtualization software and deleted that bridge.

    Any ideas?

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    On the OpenVPN server, what does ifconfig -a show?
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rubberman View Post
    On the OpenVPN server, what does ifconfig -a show?
    Code:
    [root@intranet keys]# /sbin/ifconfig -a
    eth0      Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 00:1D:09:8A:8E:84  
              inet addr:10.200.100.2  Bcast:10.200.100.255  Mask:255.255.255.0
              inet6 addr: fe80::21d:9ff:fe8a:8e84/64 Scope:Link
              UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
              RX packets:147569356 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
              TX packets:149996147 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
              collisions:0 txqueuelen:100 
              RX bytes:3786045016 (3.5 GiB)  TX bytes:2788012038 (2.5 GiB)
              Memory:fdfc0000-fdfe0000 
    
    lo        Link encap:Local Loopback  
              inet addr:127.0.0.1  Mask:255.0.0.0
              inet6 addr: ::1/128 Scope:Host
              UP LOOPBACK RUNNING  MTU:16436  Metric:1
              RX packets:331826 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
              TX packets:331826 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
              collisions:0 txqueuelen:0 
              RX bytes:37072436 (35.3 MiB)  TX bytes:37072436 (35.3 MiB)
    
    sit0      Link encap:IPv6-in-IPv4  
              NOARP  MTU:1480  Metric:1
              RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
              TX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
              collisions:0 txqueuelen:0 
              RX bytes:0 (0.0 b)  TX bytes:0 (0.0 b)
    
    vboxnet0  Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 0A:00:27:00:00:00  
              BROADCAST MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
              RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
              TX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
              collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000 
              RX bytes:0 (0.0 b)  TX bytes:0 (0.0 b)

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Ok. I suspected that's what I would find. I think this is related to the OpenVPN server itself. What happens when the client pings 10.200.100.2, the 10.x.x.x address of the server?
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rubberman View Post
    Ok. I suspected that's what I would find. I think this is related to the OpenVPN server itself. What happens when the client pings 10.200.100.2, the 10.x.x.x address of the server?
    Client can ping both 10.200.100.2 and 10.8.0.1 (the VPN leased address) no problem at all. Client can also ping all other hostnames and they resolve fine.

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    What is the subnet of the remote you are logging in from?

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    Ok so the question then becomes, where is samba? If samba is on the same server as you vpn then you can try the interface directive to bind samba to your tun and or eth adaptors while keeping it off vmnet. Note you'll need to create a static tun adaptor (openvpn --mktun) else nmb will die. Then it becomes either routing problem or wins assignement problem. If it resides on a vm or else where then its already a routing problem because it's on a vmnet interface so you'll either allow the traffic tobe forwarded there or bridge the adaptors so it appears with eth?. Which it become a vm bridging problem. Anyway, back to the origional quetion, where is samba.

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    Quote Originally Posted by djc1309 View Post
    What is the subnet of the remote you are logging in from?
    10.0.0.x

    This weird ip doesn't seem to show up on other machines so it's something specific to that windows box.

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    Quote Originally Posted by beaker_ View Post
    Ok so the question then becomes, where is samba? If samba is on the same server as you vpn then you can try the interface directive to bind samba to your tun and or eth adaptors while keeping it off vmnet. Note you'll need to create a static tun adaptor (openvpn --mktun) else nmb will die. Then it becomes either routing problem or wins assignement problem. If it resides on a vm or else where then its already a routing problem because it's on a vmnet interface so you'll either allow the traffic tobe forwarded there or bridge the adaptors so it appears with eth?. Which it become a vm bridging problem. Anyway, back to the origional quetion, where is samba.
    Samba is on the VPN machine. See my last reply though.

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    Then confirm from your win machine that is a resolution problem by access with ip address. Does either \\10.8.0.1 or \\10.200.100.2 pullup samba? Basically I just want to know that samba isn't resolving the 192.168.122.x for you because that's where it is.

    Late edit: woops I see the 10.0.0.x in your last post. Sorry. Something else going on.

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