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Hello all, I am working on setting up some networking connections here. Can someone take a look FROM: www(dot)tomshardware(dot)com/forum/25739-41-2wire-router-setup-switch-server depending on your router make and model You can disable the ...
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  1. #1
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    Now, exactly *why*do I need a DNS?


    Hello all,

    I am working on setting up some networking connections here. Can someone take a look

    FROM: www(dot)tomshardware(dot)com/forum/25739-41-2wire-router-setup-switch-server

    depending on your router make and model You can disable the dhcp server on the router if you go to advanced setup and in the dhcp option You should find two radio buttons off and on
    click off and you will disable the dhcp server on the router
    refer to your router documentations

    I do not wish to disable the DHCP on my router (2wire). I have fixed the router so it assigns static IP
    addresses - by following the Management and Console Diagnostic" portion on this page:

    support(dot)2wire(dot)com/?page=view&article=126

    There are 7 machines getting IP addresses from the 2wire router. Of the 7, I have configured 4 to have static IP addresses allocated to them by the router.

    For example, the domain here is : 2wire.gateway.net
    If I have a host named "zazu", and I ping zazu.2wire.gateway.net, I get the right IP address.

    I am working with a product (ZIMBRA) that
    -> requires for the host to "have MX records".
    -> that you get a FQDN when typing "hostname"
    -> that you get a FQDN when typing "hostname -f"

    Basically, the way it is supposed to be set up is:
    ZIMBRA (internal) <----> Kerio Mail Server (Windows) <---> email from the outside world

    So, in a sense, the Kerio Mail Server is to forward mail received from the outside world to ZIMBRA and ZIMBRA is to send mail to the Kerio Mail Server to send it to the outside world.

    From what I see at these links:
    www(dot)groupsrv(dot)com/linux/about139073.html
    AND
    articles(dot)techrepublic(dot)com(dot)com/5100-10878_11-6180677.html

    You have to set up some kind of DNS server? Why? Don't both the DHCP server and DNS server serve the same thing? How can I incorporate a DNS server into my setup when the 2wire (with DHCP) is working just fine?

    Any help, hints or advice is appreciated.

    TIA

  2. #2
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by d0mufasa View Post
    You have to set up some kind of DNS server? Why? Don't both the DHCP server and DNS server serve the same thing?
    I've not had to actually configure a name server, so I can't help there.
    But it seems like you might be confused as to the purpose of DHCP server vs. DNS.

    DHCP is, to put it simply, the process of actually assigning an IP address to a device That would be the numerical address that is actually seen and used by networking devices.

    DNS, on the other hand, acts as a translation service. Its role is to translate the numerical IP system into a human readable form. Example, the IP address 64.233.181.103 is translated to Google.

    I hope that helps a little.
    Jay

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  3. #3
    Linux Enthusiast scathefire's Avatar
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    If you have your own DNS server, point it to there. Otherwise your router, which I assume is connected to an ISP, is getting an address and DNS information from them. So the clients on the inside will technically be asking the router for DNS resolution. The router, in turn, queries the outside until an answer is received, and is handed back to whomever on the network made the request.
    linux user # 503963

  4. #4
    Linux Engineer rcgreen's Avatar
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    Basically, the way it is supposed to be set up is:
    ZIMBRA (internal) <----> Kerio Mail Server (Windows) <---> email from the outside world

    So, in a sense, the Kerio Mail Server is to forward mail received from the outside world to ZIMBRA and ZIMBRA is to send mail to the Kerio Mail Server to send it to the outside world.
    If Kerio Mail Server is run by your ISP, all you need to do is
    forward your mail to it, and receive incoming from it. They handle
    DNS so that people sending mail through them will reach you.
    If people on the net send mail directly to your server,
    you would need a DNS server to publish your domain. If you aren't
    running your own domain, you don't need to run a DNS server
    facing the internet.

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