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i am a newbee in linux networking???? anyone give some tips for setting up network,servers,and other stuff in this field.. a tut will be welcomed ....
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  1. #1
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    newbee in linux networking


    i am a newbee in linux networking????


    anyone give some tips for setting up network,servers,and other stuff in this field..


    a tut will be welcomed .

  2. #2
    Trusted Penguin Dapper Dan's Avatar
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    Your request could be answered in a variety of ways, so I'll just share with you how we network machines.

    Can you say, ssh?

    ssh is the best way for machines to talk to each other without eavesdroppers easily intercepting information or passwords.

    Make sure each of your boxes has installed on them openssh server and client software. Most Linux disributions already have ssh installed, or available to install.

    Once openssh is operational on your machines, it's an easy matter to have them talk to each other. Let's say you are sitting at machineone, and want to contact machinetwo, and both are on the networkone network.

    Open a terminal and go:

    ssh machinetwo@networkone [enter]

    It will ask for machinetwo@networkone's password. Type it in and press enter. You should now be "in" machine two, and can find and download files.

    Let's say machinetwo has a "folder" in its home directory called, (what else), folderone. folderone contains several files, but you're interested in transfering filethree.rtf to your box which is machineone. You would use "scp" or secure copy. To make the transfer happen, after you have contacted machinetwo, you would go:

    scp folderone/filethree.rtf machineone@networkone:/home/machineone

    It will then ask for the password for machineone. Enter it, and the file should then get transferred.

    Should you want to tranfer all the files in folderone, you could download the whole folder by going:

    scp -r folderone machineone@networkone:/home/machineone

    You can also use just that machines IP address. As in:

    ssh machinetwo@ 192.168.1.102[enter]

    Then, to transfer the same folder...

    scp -r folderone machineone@ 192.168.1.101:/home/machineone

    (the above, without the space after @)

    If you don't know the IP of a particular machine, from the command line go...

    /sbin/ifconfig [enter]

    ...and you should see it there.

    I haven't had much sleep so I hope this all makes sense... :sleep:
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  3. #3
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    Hey
    No more replies seen
    I think u hav did it
    Share the experience so that more newbees can look at it
    Tell ur configuration,how do u share net,wat wer the hurdles faced, r u using proxies or firewall in ur network etc and etc
    it ll be quite useful

    plsssss

  4. #4
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    hi,

    I would want to believe what you were referring to below is only for Linux-Linux machines. How about Linux-Windows.

    Toks


    Quote Originally Posted by Dapper Dan
    Your request could be answered in a variety of ways, so I'll just share with you how we network machines.

    Can you say, ssh?

    ssh is the best way for machines to talk to each other without eavesdroppers easily intercepting information or passwords.

    Make sure each of your boxes has installed on them openssh server and client software. Most Linux disributions already have ssh installed, or available to install.

    Once openssh is operational on your machines, it's an easy matter to have them talk to each other. Let's say you are sitting at machineone, and want to contact machinetwo, and both are on the networkone network.

    Open a terminal and go:

    ssh machinetwo@networkone [enter]

    It will ask for machinetwo@networkone's password. Type it in and press enter. You should now be "in" machine two, and can find and download files.

    Let's say machinetwo has a "folder" in its home directory called, (what else), folderone. folderone contains several files, but you're interested in transfering filethree.rtf to your box which is machineone. You would use "scp" or secure copy. To make the transfer happen, after you have contacted machinetwo, you would go:

    scp folderone/filethree.rtf machineone@networkone:/home/machineone

    It will then ask for the password for machineone. Enter it, and the file should then get transferred.

    Should you want to tranfer all the files in folderone, you could download the whole folder by going:

    scp -r folderone machineone@networkone:/home/machineone

    You can also use just that machines IP address. As in:

    ssh machinetwo@ 192.168.1.102[enter]

    Then, to transfer the same folder...

    scp -r folderone machineone@ 192.168.1.101:/home/machineone

    (the above, without the space after @)

    If you don't know the IP of a particular machine, from the command line go...

    /sbin/ifconfig [enter]

    ...and you should see it there.

    I haven't had much sleep so I hope this all makes sense... :sleep:

  5. #5
    Trusted Penguin Dapper Dan's Avatar
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    Sorry, I only use Linux. Someone else can likely help with Linux-Windows communicaton.
    Linux Mint + IceWM Registered: #371367 New Members: click here

  6. #6
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    This is assuming that the machines can communicate, IE ping each other.

    vncviewer on linux will talk with a RealVNC (realvnc.com) server on the Windows machine to give you the full windows desktop on your linux machine.
    rdesktop on linux will talk with a Remote Desktop setup on Windows. I believe in 2k and 2k3 this is on by default, but you may actually have to go into the mmc console and turn it on? This will also give you the full windows desktop on your linux machine, just a different technology.
    putty for windows (google for 'putty') will allow you to SSH from your windows machine into your linux machine, giving you that warm, fuzzy feeling you get when you stare at the command line. Mmm . . . text-only.

    All of these programs are available free (RealVNC is no-cost, Putty is open-source, rdesktop and vncviewer on linux are GPL). The only thing not free is the RDesktop service for MS, which is rolled into the cost of the OS.

    Best,

    Samuel
    I respectfully decline the invitation to join your delusion.

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