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So you are right, setup virtual network using Virtual Box. And I suggest buying Linux Firewalls by Steve Suehring and Robert Ziegler. Its a great book for learning firewall concepts ...
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  1. #11
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    So you are right, setup virtual network using Virtual Box.
    And I suggest buying Linux Firewalls by Steve Suehring and Robert Ziegler. Its a great book for learning firewall concepts and iptables.

    For setting up network among VMs please first refer Chapter*6 from VirtualBox manual.*Virtual Networking. And try examples and scripts from the book.

    --
    Regards,
    Sachin

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmic_cow View Post
    Please read my messages before replying; this is not a production firewall, this is ONLY FOR ME TO LEARN. The company I will be working for uses dedicated Vyatta hardware running Vyatto OS for their primaryfirewalls, so it will not be an issue. That have smaller subnets for different environments where they use dedicated boxes using ip tables; I believe the distro they use for those is Debian. The network I want to set up is not going to be a large network running a lot of traffic; it will be a small, virtualized network so that I can learn this stuff. That's it.
    What I specifically asked for was how to set up the virtualized NETWORK on VirtualBox and run it through the firewall VM, also on VirtualBox.
    I do appreciate the information you guys have provided; it's all been very useful stuff, but it doesn't actually adress my initial question.
    Thanks,
    Colin
    I read it pretty good, my answer stays the same. I understand that you just need a test environment to work with, but it in this case it is different enough from a true FW scenario that I would not recommend it. Just my humble opinion. It is certainly possible, though, and I'm sure once you get started, if you run into problems, people here will be happy to help you.

    Good luck whatever you decide.

  3. #13
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    @ssd7: Thank you, Sachin, I'll definitely look for that book. And it hadn't even occured to me to check the VirtualBox manual; I guess I didn't expect this to be something that would be covered in it. Thank you very much!
    @atreyu: The person I will be directly working with and learning from is the one who suggested this setup; it's not meant to be a long-term scenario to learn from or maintain, as I will soon be working in the production environment. It's merely a way for me to get my feet wet and learn the basics. It's just something so that when I hit "sink or swim" mode when I start, I have a better chance of swimming. I do appreciate the input, and will definitely keep it in mind in future work. I had long suspected that virtualized firewalls were not ideal, and I'm glad to have had input from others to confirm that. I'm sure I will be coming back here once I actually start working there.
    Thanks,
    Colin

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  5. #14
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    Hey,

    From a purely VM-ish standpoint, I would definitely recommend KVM and RHEL6 (or CentOS 6 for a free binary-compatible alternative). It is very robust, not too hard to setup, and the performance is quite good. Best of all, it is fully integrated into the OS.

    There is a (quite large) document (pdf) on it here.

  6. #15
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    but I think VirtualBox is perfect for you. Easy to install, easy to setup VMs, easy to manage. otoh, for production environment KVM definitely will win. but it does not have official management tool, all the tools available are third party, though its cli is very powerful and feature rich.
    If you want simple and easy setup and management then virtualbox wins hands down.

  7. #16
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    @ssd7,
    What distro are talking about that does not support KVM natively? RHEL/CentOS 6 is pretty easy:
    Code:
    yum install virt-manager
    virt-manager

  8. #17
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    in my humble opinion virtualbox is more user friendly than kvm.

    please have a look at following post showing comparison between virtualbox and kvm:

    thevarguy.com/2010/06/14/virtualbox-vs-kvm-on-the-desktop-a-comparison/

    --
    Regards,
    Sachin Divekar

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