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I don't really know how to approach this subject, I will start by saying that trying to network 2 kubuntu machines has been possibly the hardest task I've ever attempted ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined! dureal99d's Avatar
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    Networking 2 or more Linux Machines


    I don't really know how to approach this subject, I will start by saying that trying to network 2 kubuntu machines has been possibly the hardest task I've ever attempted to complete in the system world, I do keep in my mind the fact that I don't know how to is whats makes it extremely hard plus the fact that there are very limited documentation available on how to equaled with the fact that those that know how to talk to you & or attempt to teach you as if you should already know how. instead of teaching you the nuts and bolts of this Linux networking thing so that a thorough understanding can exist. with that said can someone please help me understand how to network 2 or more kubuntu machines.

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    Are you trying to simply connect just the two machines to each other (e.g., via a crossover cable, or a single switch with connections going to both)?

    Do you want them to only be able to communicate with each other - or with the entirety of the internet also?
    If the latter, do you have a router/switch for them to both communicate through or will one of them be acting as the router and providing the connection to the other?
    How do you want them to talk? Just view each other's existence (ping, etc)? Enable remote login/commands (SSH)? Share files (FTP/SCP/SFTP/HTTPD)?

    Just in case all of that is too technical:
    Basically: What are you trying to actually accomplish (as a task, not just "connect on network")?

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    Quote Originally Posted by dayid View Post
    Are you trying to simply connect just the two machines to each other (e.g., via a crossover cable, or a single switch with connections going to both)?

    Do you want them to only be able to communicate with each other - or with the entirety of the internet also?
    If the latter, do you have a router/switch for them to both communicate through or will one of them be acting as the router and providing the connection to the other?
    How do you want them to talk? Just view each other's existence (ping, etc)? Enable remote login/commands (SSH)? Share files (FTP/SCP/SFTP/HTTPD)?

    Just in case all of that is too technical:
    Basically: What are you trying to actually accomplish (as a task, not just "connect on network")?
    I am trying to set it up similar to windows where as i can look up a system not only by ip but by the name (win) where i click in the network box and all of the machines on my network appear. and yes i use a router to connet all my machine via lan cards.

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    Then you need both machines to have TCP/IP connectivity (possibly already done via DHCP from your router) and *name resolution.* That is, some way that an arbitrary name resolves to an IP address. Windows users often take this for granted, not realizing that Window's very outdated/slow/insecure "NetBIOS" broadcasts are doing this without their configuration and/or consent.

    You can Google for more information on name resolution. With Linux, you can enable "Windows-like" behavior by enabling Samba (although I am not sure why one would want to do this in an all-NIX environment.) Instead of trying to "make Linux behave like Windows," try learning how other OS'es work.

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    Quote Originally Posted by HROAdmin26 View Post
    Then you need both machines to have TCP/IP connectivity (possibly already done via DHCP from your router) and *name resolution.* That is, some way that an arbitrary name resolves to an IP address. Windows users often take this for granted, not realizing that Window's very outdated/slow/insecure "NetBIOS" broadcasts are doing this without their configuration and/or consent.

    You can Google for more information on name resolution. With Linux, you can enable "Windows-like" behavior by enabling Samba (although I am not sure why one would want to do this in an all-NIX environment.) Instead of trying to "make Linux behave like Windows," try learning how other OS'es work.
    I agree this is my attempt to learn how another o/s works which is why i need help to understand certain things and by the way i am pretty technically knowledgeable i just don't understand some things about this o/s i see people claim its superiority and that may well be true but what good is it without the knowledge of how to use that to ones advantage. All Im saying is a Complete answer would really be helpful in getting me started so i can then possibly deploying several diff configurations. them telling me how it works means nothing. Again Linux people always explain things as if it should be easy to you because its easy to them i just don't understand that pattern of thinking its an extremely arrogant mindset, still let me stay on topic bottom line is im trying to learn what i need to do to network with other machines so i can access shares and view machines on my network both Linux machines and windows machines if you cant answer plain please spare me the its easy and all that crap, if its so easy then explain it to me in detail in stead of answering a question with a question which is what im finding im getting a lot of on this forum.

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    Here is your question:

    I will start by saying that trying to network 2 kubuntu machines
    As was already asked because it made no sense, *what* does this mean? What are you trying to do? Your answer was "browse the PC's on the network like Windows does." Well technically, there is no behavior in *Nix like this. It's a Windows behavior. As mentioned, *Samba* is a suite of applications that mimic "server message block" (SMB/CIFS) functionality to allow Nix/Windows interoperability. Assuming you already understand the basics of TCP/IP networking, SMB/CIFS, client/server application models, and NetBIOS (as these are all things used by Windows), then the only "change" in using Linux is that there is no NetBIOS/CIFS (without Samba) and that *Nix typically uses NFS to share files between systems.

    If you don't care about these things, then the simplest solution is to Google "how to share files in XXX" where XXX is your Linux distro. Because Kubuntu is built from Ubuntu, you can use Ubuntu guides as well.

    The simplest way to ensure name resolution is by setting each system with a static IP address, and then editing the /etc/hosts file on each system with the name you want to use and the static IP address. Then when the system needs to lookup system SERVER8, it always knows the IP it should be found at.

    You can also use the SSH server as a "file sharing" method - one example.

    In short, you can't get a good answer without a good question. When someone says "I want to do XYZ like it I do in Windows" they are placing extraneous requirements without asking their core question - how do you share files in Kubuntu? (Or is it really a requirement to look exactly like Windows?)

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    So i understand now. I did not think it would be so different to set up a local area network in Linux. So i must edit the config file so when i open the config folder it will let me see Linux machines and if samba is installed and configured properly windows machines. I do not require it to look just like windows i simply used that as the platform in an attempt to convey that task i am attempting to perform and what results i would like from the task. and i know Linux can see and read and write to both windows and Linux machines alike as i had an Pre-configured version i used on a thumb drive that i loved simply for its ability to do this. all i am trying to do is recreate this environment on a full install. i don't think that should be such a hard question to answer. for example you informed me i must edit this config file in a certain folder, OK fine. what parts in particular must be edited for me to accomplish this task? should i post a copy of that config file on the forum? and if i did would this help you assist me on what to edit and why i would edit it. this is what i seek.
    Last edited by dureal99d; 05-19-2012 at 02:30 PM.

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