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So, I know this is an easy question, but I have Googled and Googled, but I can't find anything that will work. I'm trying to rsync to an online Linux ...
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  1. #1
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    Easy one: rsync over netcat behind firewall


    So, I know this is an easy question, but I have Googled and Googled, but I can't find anything that will work. I'm trying to rsync to an online Linux repository in order to set up a local mirror. The machine I want to mirror to is firewalled on 873 to the internet, but there is another machine that I can use as a middleman that has this access. Using netcat (or something else?), how do I tunnel rsync from machine A to machine B over port, say, 8080, and then redirect that traffic to the repository online via 873? (Obviously, I don't have access to the online repository to set up listeners - it's a public server I don't own).

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    If it were easy, you'd have the solution already!
    My suggestion is to create a VPN (virtual private network) between the client and the host. You may need to run OpenVPN on the host/server where you want to rsync to, but once you create the VPN connection between your client and that host, rsync will run without issues. Also, all data between the endpoints will be encrypted!
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  3. #3
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    Perhaps I spoke too soon when saying that this is easy. I just know that setting up netcat tunnels isn't that hard, but I'm just not getting it to work. I've done SSH tunnels before, but in this situation, encryption isn't really necessary at all - I'm just mirroring an open-source Linux mirror, after all!

    Maybe providing a simpler yet similar scenario would be helpful. Say I have two machines on my network, A and B. Machine A does not have access to the internet while machine B does. How can I tunnel traffic from machine A through machine B so that I can browse the internet (or just simply be able to wget google.com)? Here's some "pseudobash:"

    export http_proxy=machineA:8080
    8080:machineA:8080 > machineB
    8080:machineB:80 > google.com

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  5. #4
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    You still need some sort of tunnel, and a vpn, or ctunnel, or stunnel would be reasonable means to do this. You can use netcat, but it is clumsy and not necessarily reliable for this sort of purpose. It is also very narrow in its application, whereas a vpn will give you a full network connection to the internal-capable system and its outside resources (connectivity).
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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