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I want to know, when a network card is activated, ie. it's driver is 1st loaded, how does the kernel know that now, yes, let's take everything arriving here and ...
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  1. #1
    Linux User
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    How is TCP/IP enabled on an interface inside the kernel?


    I want to know, when a network card is activated, ie. it's driver is 1st loaded, how does the kernel know that now, yes, let's take everything arriving here and give it to the IP processing part? I'm guessing that that's what ifconfig up does, but I'd like to know exactly what goes on when that happens.


    thanks.
    ivotkl likes this.

  2. #2
    Linux Newbie
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    Hello resetreset. Thank you for writing, I wish 2014 found you well.

    That's some nice question you've made. After a short research I was able to find this file, but I'm not sure if it will help (although I hope it does).

  3. #3
    Linux Guru
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    Quote Originally Posted by resetreset View Post
    I want to know, when a network card is activated, ie. it's driver is 1st loaded, how does the kernel know that now, yes, let's take everything arriving here and give it to the IP processing part? I'm guessing that that's what ifconfig up does, but I'd like to know exactly what goes on when that happens.


    thanks.
    Actually, ifconfig up activates the interface. The driver may be compiled into the kernel and not loaded at all, or it may be loaded at boot but it isn't impacted by ifconfig. Drivers interact with the kernel in a manner prescribed by the kernel - books like this go into detail Linux Device Drivers, Third Edition [LWN.net]. Drivers interact with the device in a way prescribed by the device - special knowledge is needed although many devices conform to industry specifications. Here's a good article: Writing Network Device Drivers for Linux LG #156

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  5. #4
    Linux Engineer docbop's Avatar
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    The real requires a knowledge of how operating systems work in general and the TCP/IP and the OSI model to understand the theoritcal layers of the IP stack. Douglas Comer wrote a excellent series of books on TCP/IP years ago on the topic. Here a article on Linux kenel and networking that might get you started.

    http://www.ecsl.cs.sunysb.edu/elibra...oom=auto,0,566

    You are in the Open Source world so the full answer is in the source code.

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