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What do these things DO? And how do I configure them? Thanks....
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  1. #1
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    What exactly are NIS and LDAP?


    What do these things DO? And how do I configure them?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    NIS and LDAP are two different means for network-based identity registration. OpenLDAP is compatible (more or less) with Microsoft's user/directory registry. NIS is the old Sun (now Oracle) registry tool. We used to use that back in the "dark ages" so that when you logged into your system, it would set up the appropriate user/group IDs for your account, allowing NFS file links to show/allow the proper permissions for you. LDAP/OpenLDAP does the same thing, but are "standards" now.

    As for "configuring" them, that is an entirely different issue, and one that takes some study to accomplish. RTFM comes to mind - NIS and LDAP are VERY different in those respects!
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  3. #3
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    Well thanks. So, after configuring them and all, I can type in my username and password into XP OR Fedora, and have those usernames and passwords be created on a remote server, right?

  4. #4
    Linux Engineer docbop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by resetreset View Post
    Well thanks. So, after configuring them and all, I can type in my username and password into XP OR Fedora, and have those usernames and passwords be created on a remote server, right?
    NIS is the later version of Sun's Yellow Pages one of the early directory servers. NIS was used with NFS for authenication so some still use NIS. LDAP is the modern day directory service. FYI Microsofts Active Directory is a mutation of LDAP. You typically only use one or write scripts for one to update the other. They are used for authenication into services and etc they don't create accounts on remote systems, you direct remote systems to use the server with the directory service to authenticate users. In Window world scripts have to written so Active Directory updates from LDAP. XP I believe needs later service packs to support Active Directory.

    Directory servers are typically used in large installations with many users, for small installations doing things manually are easier and more educational.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by docbop View Post
    They are used for authenication into services and etc they don't create accounts on remote systems, you direct remote systems to use the server with the directory service to authenticate users. In Window world scripts have to written so Active Directory updates from LDAP. XP I believe needs later service packs to support Active Directory.
    " for authenication into services " means?

    ..direct the remote systems, meaning the clients? That's what I said, I think you're talking from point of view of a Server admin.

  6. #6
    Linux Engineer docbop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by resetreset View Post
    " I think you're talking from point of view of a Server admin.
    Always talking as SysAdmin.

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