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... watching Youtube vids, and they help a lot, my question is: If I'm trying to lookup Google , when the nameserver for google.com hands you off to the nameserver ...
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  1. #1
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    Trying to understand DNS


    ... watching Youtube vids, and they help a lot, my question is:


    If I'm trying to lookup Google, when the nameserver for google.com hands you off to the nameserver for Google , how exactly is that handled? What passes between all the computers?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    Its all done by the domain NS address record. When you want an address, you talk to your nameserver - which then looks up the domain's NS address, which can then be talked to, to resolve the address. Of course, your own nameserver might already have the detail you want and read it from it's cache (depending on the last time it was looked up and the time-to-live, TTL setting that the domain's nameserver has published).

    I think what is being suggested is that the lookup on Google.com is to find the NS address of Google's nameserver, which is then asked for the hostname lookup.
    Linux user #126863 - see http://linuxcounter.net/

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    I didn't get most of your reply. But the site munged my post above - I want to know, when I'm trying to lookup www dot google dot com , when the nameserver for google.com hands you off to the nameserver for www dot google dot com, THEN what happens?

    What exactly IS an NS record?

  4. #4
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    If you want to know what the protocol looks like and what is contained in each of the various records involved, try looking up RFC numbers 1034 and 1035.

  5. #5
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by resetreset View Post
    I didn't get most of your reply. But the site munged my post above - I want to know, when I'm trying to lookup www dot google dot com , when the nameserver for google.com hands you off to the nameserver for www dot google dot com, THEN what happens?

    What exactly IS an NS record?
    This might help, its on debanhelp.co.uk, and it explains the elements of a DNS record.
    Linux user #126863 - see http://linuxcounter.net/

  6. #6
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    I first want to just know what happens, before I start reading stuff.

    After I've got the theory, the rest is easy.

  7. #7
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by resetreset View Post
    I first want to just know what happens, before I start reading stuff.

    After I've got the theory, the rest is easy.
    Hmmm, well I posted a link that gives you the answer to the exact question you asked me. How can you hope to understand what happens in this scenario as the explanation will inevitably include terms you don't yet understand. You have already been given the theory in one form, you're going to have to use some documentation at some stage. And you're already reaching that stage in a lot of areas. Look at it this way...

    If I type it out here longhand, you'd probably understand less by reading my explanation than reading from some website that have already thought through the best way to present the information to help you understand.

    In short, that link I posted gives you a better answer than I can type in a small box on this forum. There are several volunteers on this forum who have provided their time to help you on your Linux journey so far. If you really want to learn from them, them respect their help by reading the information they recommend. It -will- help you.
    Linux user #126863 - see http://linuxcounter.net/

  8. #8
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    To get the theory, in its simplest form and if your old enough to remember using one, think a phone book.
    DNS is Domain Name Service. If you go look up the name of your favorite pizza place in the phone book, beside it you see its number and address. In DNS, the name, is equal to the number (address of the URL). As I told one of my nieces, the name, gives you a "go to" statement.

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