Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 9 of 9
When a mail comes in, the mailing list software has to be triggered, right? So that it can then look up all the other users who are subscribed to that ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Linux User
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    360

    How does mailing list software work?


    When a mail comes in, the mailing list software has to be triggered, right? So that it can then look up all the other users who are subscribed to that list, and send them each a copy?
    How is the triggering done?


    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Nottingham, England
    Posts
    3,885
    You can set up your email system so that it pipes incoming mail to whatever you like, even a script or a binary executable file. It can then process the email using logic rules written in program code.
    Linux user #126863 - see http://linuxcounter.net/

  3. #3
    Linux User
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    360
    Written in which language? How do I do the setting up? (Is this true for all common smtpd's on the market? Which is the one that ships with Fedora or CentOS?)

  4. #4
    Linux User
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    360
    hello? are you there?

  5. #5
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Nottingham, England
    Posts
    3,885
    There are four major mail transport agents you could use. Postfix, Sendmail, exim and qmail.

    How you configure your mail server depends on which MTA you're using. In Sendmail, for instance, you use the aliases table to point a mail address at an executable file, a bit like using a pipe in the command line. When a mail is received at the address specified, the mail server launches the specified app or script to process the incoming text-base email file. This, I believe, is the 'trigger' you wanted. I've never done this myself (never needed to) and out of those four I've only ever played with Sendmail at a serious production level. All I can say is that it always looked really easy to do.

    Are you sure you want to do this on Fedora, though? For a mail server the goal is surely long-term stability, which would mean setting it up on a 'server' type platform. My own MTA (which serves about 8 domains) runs on CentOS.
    Linux user #126863 - see http://linuxcounter.net/

  6. #6
    Linux User
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    360
    Thanks. Can you give me some idea of what a "aliases table" is?

  7. #7
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Nottingham, England
    Posts
    3,885
    Quote Originally Posted by resetreset View Post
    Thanks. Can you give me some idea of what a "aliases table" is?
    It's in /etc/mail/aliases or somewhere similar. It's a text file - and it also has a man page.
    Linux user #126863 - see http://linuxcounter.net/

  8. #8
    Linux User
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    360
    sorry, what should I man? i can't find a file called that on my system, CentOS 6.3 - I don't even have a "/etc/mail" directory. but then I doubt I have any MTA installed!

  9. #9
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Nottingham, England
    Posts
    3,885
    Ahh, you're probably right - no MTA means the files aren't there and the man pages aren't installed... but here's a great tip - you can just do the man page line in your favourite search engine (provided your favourite search engine isn't Bing). In this case you just need to look at the man page for 'aliases', so if you do this:

    Code:
    man aliases
    in Google, Duckduckgo, or whatever you use, you'll find it no problem.
    Linux user #126863 - see http://linuxcounter.net/

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •