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  1. #1

    Usage meter


    While surfing the web, if I'd like to know how much of my ISPs quota has been used, how do I check?

    Like, I'd like to go to a particular site, then click it off, and see how many MBs I spent there.

    My specific intention is to see what SPEED is the lowest I can take from my ISP, so that I can see Youtube etc. etc. without skipping.

    How?


    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    If your ISP has caps on download volumes then you should be able to login to your account and see what you have used in the last month, or relevant period. Myself, I NEVER purchase a plan with download caps or throttling, which is why I pay a bit more for a commercial/business plan. No caps and no throttling.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  3. #3
    That's not answering the question - how in Linux do I get to know how much I've used?

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  5. #4
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    I don't know how to associate amounts with specific sites, though there are a couple of gui system monitors, one of which will show the total bytes sent and received since the system was booted as well as current second-by-second usage.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  6. #5
    cool, cool - what's it called?

  7. #6
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    On my system in the Applications tab in the UI there are two System Monitor entries in the System Tools page. In my case, the one with the total data sent/received is the second one. Look on your system and see if you have something like that. FWIW, I use the gnome UI on a clone of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.5.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  8. #7
    Linux User
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    If you run this command:

    Code:
    sar -n DEV 2 10
    You'll get per-interface network usage stats. In the example I gave you'll get 10 samples taken 2 seconds apart with a average over the whole sample period. There are per-second counters for both packets sent/received and bytes sent/received.

  9. #8
    Rubber: OK, I don't have two, but the one I *did* have shows it to me - thanks, man!

    cname: There is no command called "sar" on my system - Fedora 20.

  10. #9
    Linux Engineer drl's Avatar
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    Hi.

    On a system like:
    Code:
    OS, ker|rel, machine: Linux, 3.11.4-201.fc19.x86_64, x86_64
    Distribution        : Fedora 19 KDE (Schrödinger’s Cat)
    Code:
    yum info sysusage.noarch
    Description : SysUsage continuously monitor your systems informations and
                : generate periodical graph reports using rrdtool or javascript
                : jqplot library. All reports are shown throught a web interface.
    Code:
    yum info sysstat.x86_64 
    Description : The sysstat package contains sar, sadf, mpstat, iostat, pidstat,
                : nfsiostat, cifsiostat and sa tools for Linux.
    While it is not Fedora 20, it may be available there ... cheers, drl
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  11. #10
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    DRL is correct. SAR is part of the sysstat package, which should be installed by default on every system. On RHEL 6.x systems it is installed as /usr/bin/sar. I am not sure about FC20. It may be in /sbin or /usr/sbin which would only be accessible by root or sudo. If the sysstat package isn't installed, you should be able to do that easily enough with the command "yum install sysstat".
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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