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Hi, First post for me! Well, I was wondering if anyone knew how I could get my modem [stated in the subject] to run on Mandrake 10.1. I did a ...
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  1. #1
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    Best Data 56hp92 Question


    Hi,

    First post for me! Well, I was wondering if anyone knew how I could get my modem [stated in the subject] to run on Mandrake 10.1. I did a brief google and turned up nothing in the drivers category. Should I just invenst in another modem or does someone know how I can do it with what I have? Thanks, and sorry if I'm repeating any posts. I looked through some of the threads but didn't find anything specific enough to answer my question.

    P.S. The search feature for the threads 'ain't' too good. 'Less I'm doing something wrong :O

    Thanks again.

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer Nerderello's Avatar
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    I'm assumin that your modem is a PCI (ie. is installed inside your PC). If yes, then what you have is a winmodem, and so need to look up stuff about LINMODEMs (ie. the Linux versions of them). What happens, you see, is that a program (driver) on your PC does most of the computing work for the modem (an external modem has this built in, which is why they're more expensive) and what you need to do is find the Linux version of that program. The way it works for Linux is that PCI modem cards are split according to their chipset (often Lucent, but not necessarily), so you'll find a driver for ALL Lucent chipped modems and another for ALL Conexant chipped modems, etc.

    To find out what type you have, have a look at the chips on the modem card or check out http://www.linmodems.org/ also have a looik at the tutorial section of this site http://www.linuxforums.org/forum/topic-3100.html which may be of some help.

    have fun

    Nerderello

    Use Suse 10.1 and occasionally play with Kubuntu
    Also have Windows 98SE and BeOS

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    Thanks.

    Thanks for the quick response! I can probably figure everything out with what you gave me. Things are going a bit slow now though, because my machine is at home and I am at work I'll be working on it later tonite...and I'll post if I get it figured out...or if I have another question of course.

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    So far so good. I'm writing this reply in linux! But I do have a problem. I had to run these commands near the end of my setup:

    modprobe slamr
    /usr/sbin/slmodemd --country=USA /dev/slamr0

    And I get this message:
    SmartLink Soft Modem: version 2.9.10 Jan 21 2005 21:41:18
    symbolic link `/dev/ttySL0' -> `/dev/pts/2' created.
    modem `slamr0' created. TTY is `/dev/pts/2'
    Use `/dev/ttySL0' as modem device, Ctrl+C for termination.

    Now my internet works fine, but if I do Ctrl+C my connection will be interupted. I'm unclear on what to do next. How do I make it so I dont have to run those commands everytime?

  5. #5
    Linux Engineer Nerderello's Avatar
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    try using kppp as your dialer and ppp starter upper. In the configure part, tell it that your m odem device is called /dev/ttySL0

    Thing to understand. In Windows, if you start a program (like internet explorer) that needs a TCP/IP connection, then windows will start the dialup thingie for you. In Linux you have to do this for yourself. And that goes for disconnecting as well.

    If kppp doesn't work, you could always create a new desktop icon to run the commands for you (probably need to say that you want to run them in a terminal window (you'll see what I mean).

    have fun

    Nerderello

    Use Suse 10.1 and occasionally play with Kubuntu
    Also have Windows 98SE and BeOS

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    I used kppp to connect last time, and it is pointed to /dev/ttySL0. But whenever I exit the terminal that I issued those commands I was talking about, ttySL0 dissapears and so does my internet connect. I think I'll have to do those commands everytime no matter what, but I can use some sort of script so I dont have to type both of them. Know of an easy way to pull this off?

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    Linux Engineer Nerderello's Avatar
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    just wondering if making it a background task by putting an ampersand (&) after it will help.

    If not, open up your favorite editor, enter the commands on separate lines :-

    modprobe slamr
    /usr/sbin/slmodemd --country=USA /dev/slamr0

    save this as a file (such as nerderello and then open a terminal and make the file executable by "chmod +x nerderello" (or whatever you decide to call it) then run it (either by entering ./nerderello (the "./" says to Linux, don't bother looking in the usual places for this script, it is in the folder that I'm in at the moment) or create a desktop icon/launcher to do a similar thing .

    have fun

    Nerderello

    Use Suse 10.1 and occasionally play with Kubuntu
    Also have Windows 98SE and BeOS

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    Wow, that easy eh? Well, thanks for all the help man. Made this whole process alot easier. .....Now...dare I even attempt installing some ati drivers...lol. I don't think so.

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    I was hoping that maybe there was a way to run these commands at the start of KDE (kde 3.2). Do you know how I could do that? BTW, the commands that I need to issue need root permissions as well. And its just my computer so I have the root pass. Thanks again.

  10. #10
    Linux Engineer Nerderello's Avatar
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    I'm not that familiar with Mandrake. You may be able to put the modprobe command into /etc/modules.conf or /etc/modprobe.conf . As for the other command, have a look at the autostart facility that KDE offers (have a look at the help text in the start menu).

    have fun

    Nerderello

    Use Suse 10.1 and occasionally play with Kubuntu
    Also have Windows 98SE and BeOS

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