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I have a cable modem connection that is connected directly to a Linksys router (IP 192.168.1.1). The router has connections to two PCs, one of which is running Windows 2000. ...
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  1. #1
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    Networking with Windows 2000


    I have a cable modem connection that is connected directly to a Linksys router (IP 192.168.1.1). The router has connections to two PCs, one of which is running Windows 2000. This PC has two ethernet adapters, and the one connected to the router has IP 192.168.1.100. I am trying firstly to connect the second network adapter to my Ubuntu system using a crossover cable, and secondly to share the internet connection between the two computers.

    I have set the IP of the second network adapter to 192.168.0.1 and the eth0 IP to 192.168.0.2, with Gateway 192.168.0.1.

    I have plugged the crossover cable into both computers, but neither card is lighting up, and the Win 2K machine claims that the LAN 2 connection is unplugged.

    What could be causing this problem? I know the cable not to be faulty, as I have used it before.

    Furthermore, once the two computers are able to see each other, does anyone know how to set up internet connection sharing (ICS) with a Linux machine? Does it work the same as with another Windows machine?

    Any help would be most appreciated.

    Cheers.

  2. #2
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    first, make sure both the nic is working by connecting them to the router with a straight cable

    second, make sure your ubuntu recognise your ethernet card, then connect it to the router with a straight cable as well

    if all of the above works (which means no faulty network card, all cards are properly identified by your OS) try this trick:

    for windows machine, go to device manager and uninstall your network card, then restart your computer. go into BIOS and find the item called "reset configuration data". Enable it, then save and exit from BIOS, reinstall your NIC's driver when windows start up and ask for driver disk or whatever-you-should-know-what-to-do.

    linux, erm.... if it's a redhat machine, what i would do is
    -shutdown the pc
    -unplug the network card
    -start the pc
    -redhat will detect that the NIC has gone, and ask whether to "remove configuration", "do nothing", or whatever i've forgotten. remove
    -shutdown the pc
    -plug in the network card
    -go into bios, "reset configuration data"
    -then during boot up the screen will pop up again to "configure NIC", "do nothing", blablabla

    i faced this problem years ago where both machines' NIC are connected properly to a hub but not with a crosscable, and the "reset configuration data" seems to solve the problem for me. hope this helps.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by adam7979
    first, make sure both the nic is working by connecting them to the router with a straight cable
    Yes all is well and good here.

    second, make sure your ubuntu recognise your ethernet card, then connect it to the router with a straight cable as well
    Ditto.

    if all of the above works (which means no faulty network card, all cards are properly identified by your OS) try this trick:

    for windows machine, go to device manager and uninstall your network card, then restart your computer. go into BIOS and find the item called "reset configuration data". Enable it, then save and exit from BIOS, reinstall your NIC's driver when windows start up and ask for driver disk or whatever-you-should-know-what-to-do.
    What exactly is the configuration data that is being reset here? Is it not possible to do the same thing from within Windows?

    linux, erm.... if it's a redhat machine, what i would do is
    -shutdown the pc
    -unplug the network card
    -start the pc
    -redhat will detect that the NIC has gone, and ask whether to "remove configuration", "do nothing", or whatever i've forgotten. remove
    -shutdown the pc
    -plug in the network card
    -go into bios, "reset configuration data"
    -then during boot up the screen will pop up again to "configure NIC", "do nothing", blablabla
    Do you mean actually physically remove the network card from its PCI slot?

    Presumably all the cables must be plugged in to the right places (Windows NIC1 into router and NIC2 into Linux NIC via crossover) in order for the configuration at this stage to be more successful? In which case I would presume that the Windows machine must be on before booting up the Linux machine. However, this means that the Windows machine must be booted up with nothing on the end of the crossover cable, so how will this mean that the configuration will be different to the one I have at the moment?

    i faced this problem years ago where both machines' NIC are connected properly to a hub but not with a crosscable, and the "reset configuration data" seems to solve the problem for me. hope this helps.
    Thanks very much for your help,

    Sethleben[/quote]

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  5. #4
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    "What exactly is the configuration data that is being reset here? Is it not possible to do the same thing from within Windows"

    yeah, what i assume is the bios does not really recognize the NIC correctly the very first time you plug in the card... so reset this configuration data somehow force BIOS to look into the NIC better and eventually make thing works ... hahahahaha my wild guess, but i did this trick twice and it works

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