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I have a server running dhcp and 2 computers using dhcp on my network. Both dhcp clients are able to get an IP, but I have 2 problems. Since the ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Guru
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    ?s about dhcpd.conf


    I have a server running dhcp and 2 computers using dhcp on my network. Both dhcp clients are able to get an IP, but I have 2 problems. Since the hostnames of "fixed-address" computers is listed in dhcpd.conf, I have removed those addresses from /etc/hosts. As a result, when I start Gnome on the server (which is fixed-address) I get a "Could not look up internet address for asussrvr" message.

    One of the client computers runs Win98. It is able to get an IP address from the dhcp server, but it is not assigned the fixed-address listed in dhcpd.conf. As a result, I am not able to address the computer by its correct hostname (see "cpqnbook" below). Following are the relevant parts of /etc/dhcpd.conf:
    Code:
    default-lease-time 600;
    max-lease-time 7200;
    option subnet-mask 255.255.255.240;
    option broadcast-address 192.168.128.95;
    option routers 192.168.128.81;
    option domain-name-servers 192.168.128.81,66.19.192.200,216.126.128.40,64.136.173.5,64.136.164.46;
    option netbios-name-servers 192.168.128.81;
     
    subnet 192.168.128.80 netmask 255.255.255.240 {
       range 192.168.128.83 192.168.128.94;
    }
     
    host asussrvr {
       hardware ethernet 00:90:27:8b:da:a0;
       fixed-address 192.168.128.81;
    }
     
    host cpqnbook {
       hardware ethernet 00:0d:88:1b:f9:86;
       fixed-address 192.168.128.90;
    }
    What should I change to get Gnome to recognize the hostname of asussrvr?
    Why does cpqnbook not get the correct IP address?

    edit: the hardware address have been verified
    I'm running Fedora Core 3 on the server.
    /IMHO
    //got nothin'
    ///this use to look better

  2. #2
    Linux User
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    Location
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    401

    Try this...

    Move the subnet declaration at last... it should work... I've got the same problem and strangely it was resolved using this trick...

    For GNOME youMUST write your /etc/hosts... This file is used to assign a name to some network address (I suggest to setup your names in /etc/hosts, and use them in your dhcpd.conf). An alternate solution is to run a DNS server (named), but this could be difficoult if haven't yet setup one of them.
    When using Windows, have you ever told "Ehi... do your business?"
    Linux user #396597 (http://counter.li.org)

  3. #3
    Linux Guru
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    Re: Try this...

    Props, burnit!.... .... The right solution and to the point. Who would have known from the available documentation? I hope to see many more posts from you here.

    Thanks and Cheers~
    (I'm livelied up, now!)
    /IMHO
    //got nothin'
    ///this use to look better

  4. #4
    Linux User
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    Italy
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    Documentation...

    Well, suturday morning with headache, but still alive...

    Documentation... for your /etc/hosts run "man hosts"... it should be sufficient!

    For configuring DNS I've found http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/DNS-HOWTO.html (bookmark the site... very usefull), but each book about networking should talk about configuring a DNS... a simple google and you'll find your case and some example...

    Well, for configuring DHCP server there are no problem (right?), because I've seen you have wrote in your own correctly...

    Bye
    When using Windows, have you ever told "Ehi... do your business?"
    Linux user #396597 (http://counter.li.org)

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