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To close the ports that are running from inetd.. edit /etc/inetd.conf, each line is a new service. put a comment (#) in front a line to prevent inetd running that ...
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  1. #11
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    To close the ports that are running from inetd..
    edit /etc/inetd.conf, each line is a new service. put a comment (#) in front a line to prevent inetd running that service. save / close inetd.conf, then restart inetd (killall -HUP inetd IIRC).

    For non-inetd services, each one may have a specific routine to shut it down and this may differ from distro to distro. - If you have a specific service and your not sure how to stop it, maybe start a new thread with the distro name and what the service is asking how to turn it off would be most effective.

    Jason

  2. #12
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    I use Mandrake 9.2, and in my system /etc/inetd.conf , doesn't exists...

  3. #13
    flw
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    Have you tried "find -name *inetd*.*" from / and as / ?
    Dan

    \"Keep your friends close and your enemies even closer\" from The Art of War by Sun Tzu\"

  4. #14
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    IIRC, Mandrake doesnt use inetd, but xinetd, so you have to edit that file. Well, I know Redhat uses xinetd, and since Mandrake was/is a clone of redhat, its highly possible that also mandrake uses it..

    Good luck

  5. #15
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    This is what the xinetd.conf contains:
    Code:
    #
    # Simple configuration file for xinetd
    #
    # Some defaults, and include /etc/xinetd.d/
    
    defaults
    {
            instances               = 60
            log_type                = SYSLOG authpriv
            log_on_success		= HOST PID
            log_on_failure		= HOST
    	cps			= 25 30
    }
    
    includedir /etc/xinetd.d

  6. #16
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    Having never used xinetd, only the older inetd, i would guess that any service you dont want to start, remove its relating file from /etc/xinetd.d/ then restart the xinetd service.

    (move them to a safe place rather than just deleting them incase you change your mind, you can always delete them later if your sure.)

    Jason

  7. #17
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    I think that the open ports are stored in /etc/services .
    Thanks for helping.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Linux_Newbie
    I think that the open ports are stored in /etc/services .
    Thanks for helping.
    /etc/services is not the open ports. /etc/services maps port numbers to a service name.

    do "man 5 services" for more info.

    Jason

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