Find the answer to your Linux question:
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 20 of 20
Oh okay, thanks, I'll call them tomorrow (they'll be closed now). Also, am I right in thinking that, although when I don't use a router I connect using DHCP, I ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #11
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    123

    Oh okay, thanks, I'll call them tomorrow (they'll be closed now).

    Also, am I right in thinking that, although when I don't use a router I connect using DHCP, I now connect using Static IPs?

  2. #12
    Linux User Stefann's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Boise, ID
    Posts
    340
    Quote Originally Posted by TomX
    Oh okay, thanks, I'll call them tomorrow (they'll be closed now).

    Also, am I right in thinking that, although when I don't use a router I connect using DHCP, I now connect using Static IPs?
    actually you should use DHCP anyways. But a call to your ISP will confirm that for me.
    Nothing is worse than ten penguins fighting over which is better, vi or emacs.
    Registered Linux User #404402
    Finally I'm back on LF after a long while.

  3. #13
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Romania
    Posts
    186
    1.Use DHCP... It will probably work if you do...

    2.
    Quote Originally Posted by TomX
    Do the subnet masks and default gateways need to be equal (on both computers)?
    Yes, absolutely. And nameservers, too.

    3.You have a maximum of 6 hosts assigned: .129 to .135... but it is highly unlikely that your ISP will just allow connections comming from your side without the address either being dynamically assigned to you via DHCP or without them explicitly stating what IPs are for you to use (did they provide you with a list of IPs that you may use at any time?). The most probable is the first option... I think the only reason the first IP works is because it was dynamically assigned to you some time ago and it's still valid as far as the DHCP server is concerned.
    You can only be young once. But you can always be immature.

  4. $spacer_open
    $spacer_close
  5. #14
    Linux User Stefann's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Boise, ID
    Posts
    340
    Quote Originally Posted by sharkyro
    1.Use DHCP... It will probably work if you do...

    2.
    Quote Originally Posted by TomX
    Do the subnet masks and default gateways need to be equal (on both computers)?
    Yes, absolutely. And nameservers, too.

    3.You have a maximum of 6 hosts assigned: .129 to .135... but it is highly unlikely that your ISP will just allow connections comming from your side without the address either being dynamically assigned to you via DHCP or without them explicitly stating what IPs are for you to use (did they provide you with a list of IPs that you may use at any time?). The most probable is the first option... I think the only reason the first IP works is because it was dynamically assigned to you some time ago and it's still valid as far as the DHCP server is concerned.
    Agreed, because most ISP's manage static addresses via DHCP to ensure that they don't get issued to someone else, and so that your hardware doesn't need special configuration as most PC's have DHCP enabled by default.
    Nothing is worse than ten penguins fighting over which is better, vi or emacs.
    Registered Linux User #404402
    Finally I'm back on LF after a long while.

  6. #15
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Romania
    Posts
    186
    Just a small note: scratch the part where I stated that you have 8 addresses assigned... you most probably have ONE address (unless specified otherwise by your ISP)... Sorry about that Had a long day, I thought you had a different subnet mask and I said a stupid thing regarding the IPs
    So, in conclusion: Try DHCP on both computers. If it doesn't work either talk to your ISP or configure NAT on your router...
    You can only be young once. But you can always be immature.

  7. #16
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    123
    Thanks for all the advice.

    Both computers work with DHCP (even when connected through the switch (I have a feeling it's a switch now )) so what you're saying seems to comply with this.

    I'll phone my ISP and them for a solution (will they give me two static IPs?)

    Thanks again,
    Tom

  8. #17
    Linux User Stefann's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Boise, ID
    Posts
    340
    Quote Originally Posted by TomX
    Thanks for all the advice.

    Both computers work with DHCP (even when connected through the switch (I have a feeling it's a switch now )) so what you're saying seems to comply with this.

    I'll phone my ISP and them for a solution (will they give me two static IPs?)

    Thanks again,
    Tom
    You have to pay extra, but more than likely.
    Nothing is worse than ten penguins fighting over which is better, vi or emacs.
    Registered Linux User #404402
    Finally I'm back on LF after a long while.

  9. #18
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    123
    My ISPs website says:
    Primary DNS 193.38.113.3
    Secondary DNS 194.117.157.4
    Tertiary DNS 194.117.152.85
    PC IP address Assigned dynamically
    (static only available for leased line customers)
    Subnet mask Assigned dynamically
    Gateway Assigned dynamically

    I assume you're right, that I'd have to pay extra for a static IP. Does this mean I'll have to find another networking solution since I cannot have two static IPs?

  10. #19
    Linux User Stefann's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Boise, ID
    Posts
    340
    Quote Originally Posted by TomX
    My ISPs website says:
    Primary DNS 193.38.113.3
    Secondary DNS 194.117.157.4
    Tertiary DNS 194.117.152.85
    PC IP address Assigned dynamically
    (static only available for leased line customers)
    Subnet mask Assigned dynamically
    Gateway Assigned dynamically

    I assume you're right, that I'd have to pay extra for a static IP. Does this mean I'll have to find another networking solution since I cannot have two static IPs?
    If it ain't broken don't fix it, if they both can connect at the same time leave it be, you don't need static IP's, just set both systems up for DHCP and your golden.
    Nothing is worse than ten penguins fighting over which is better, vi or emacs.
    Registered Linux User #404402
    Finally I'm back on LF after a long while.

  11. #20
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Romania
    Posts
    186
    Quote Originally Posted by Stefann
    Quote Originally Posted by TomX
    My ISPs website says:
    Primary DNS 193.38.113.3
    Secondary DNS 194.117.157.4
    Tertiary DNS 194.117.152.85
    PC IP address Assigned dynamically
    (static only available for leased line customers)
    Subnet mask Assigned dynamically
    Gateway Assigned dynamically

    I assume you're right, that I'd have to pay extra for a static IP. Does this mean I'll have to find another networking solution since I cannot have two static IPs?
    If it ain't broken don't fix it, if they both can connect at the same time leave it be, you don't need static IP's, just set both systems up for DHCP and your golden.
    Exactly... Why not just leave it as it is since it works just fine? Do you actually need static IPs?
    You can only be young once. But you can always be immature.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •