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Hi all, I need to know what steps should I go through to network two Fedora Core 3? I have configured my Linux to connect to Internet through Ethernet(I know ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined!
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    A Quick Explanation on How to Network 2 Linux PCs


    Hi all,

    I need to know what steps should I go through to network two Fedora Core 3?
    I have configured my Linux to connect to Internet through Ethernet(I know some basics about Linux Networking). But now I need some explanations on how to make a network of two.

    I would appreciate if some one could help, since it's kind of urgent and I can't risk to lose time by wandering around.

    Best Regards,
    Maryam

  2. #2
    Linux Enthusiast KenJackson's Avatar
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    It sounds like you have a cable modem or dsl modem that connects directly to one PC with an ethernet cable. The IP address your computer is using is probably your real IP address.

    But when you connect two PCs, you will very likely need to share that one IP address with network addres translation (NAT) and routing. There are two likely approaches. In one, you add a second ethernet port to one of the PCs which will act as a router and do NAT for the other. Connect between them with a crossover cable (or a switch or a hub). This is the more difficult approach and isn't recommended for beginners.

    The easiest approach is to go buy a router. For example, Netgear makes inexpensive routers that are available in practically every office supply store in the world. Both PC plug into the router (or connect wirelessly if it's a wireless router) and the router plugs into the cable/dsl modem. Use standard (not crossover) cables. Setup the router to do NAT and assign a local IP address range, probably 192.168.1.0/24. Change the IP addresses on both PCs to be in the local address range and the router's local address as the default route (gateway).

    Optionally, you can setup the router to automatically assign local IP addresses with DHCP. Then you can connect and disconnect PCs at will and, if they are also setup for DHCP, they will automatically be assigned IP addresses.

    A side benefit of the NAT router is that it gives you an excellent firewall, independent of anything you do on your PCs.

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