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Hello all, I am wanting to access my samba shares from my works network. The problem being that evrything is blocked apart from internet activity. I have installed a proxy ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined!
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    Apr 2006
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    Accessing samba shares at work


    Hello all,
    I am wanting to access my samba shares from my works network. The problem being that evrything is blocked apart from internet activity. I have installed a proxy so that everything is tunnelled thru port 80 therefore solving problems like ftp and ssh etc.
    The problem being when connecting to samba through windows there is no way of sending it through a proxy first.
    is there any way round this or any way to connect through the net?
    Thanks Mark

  2. #2
    Linux Enthusiast KenJackson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
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    Maryland, USA
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    Is the secure shell (SSH) port blocked? If it is, it would be a very reasonable request to unblock it.

    Using OpenSSH, I can open a bash shell window on my home PC that is actually running on my work PC. So any Windows disk share I can access at work, I can also access from home. Also, since I forward X11 (an SSH configuration option), I can start a graphics application on the remote PC and have it display on my local PC.

    If that's not acceptable, try OpenVPN. I don't know if you can use it via port 80, but you probably can. It provides an encrypted path, very much like SSH, but it's a general purpose network connection. In theory, your home PC could even join the Windows domain at work. (Of course if you do that, the admin at work will notice.) I mount my work and home PCs' disks on each other (all Linux or BSD) via an encrypted VPN.

    I use OpenVPN to display desktops from a couple of Windows PCs at work via TightVNC.

    BTW, I don't use the designated ports for anything. I always use high port numbers so you can't tell just by the port number what the traffic is. (I've never used a proxy.) You can use nmap to scan your network and see if it really is as buttoned up as you think.

    There's lots of fun networking options!

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