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I want to run a game server on my gaming box (which is running windows and is behind NAT.) Said game server apparently uses udp rather than tcp, so I ...
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    UDP forwarding


    I want to run a game server on my gaming box (which is running windows and is behind NAT.) Said game server apparently uses udp rather than tcp, so I can't use rinetd to forward the port.

    I havn't been able to find anything like rinetd that works with udp. Any suggestions? The simpler the better.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    I take it your NAT is handled by a Linux machine of some sort?

    There's a couple of options for you here. Either use IPtables to forward specific UDP ports across the NAT interface, or run the Linux version of the game server on your server machine, and have everyone connect to that.
    Linux user #126863 - see http://linuxcounter.net/

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roxoff
    I take it your NAT is handled by a Linux machine of some sort?

    There's a couple of options for you here. Either use IPtables to forward specific UDP ports across the NAT interface, or run the Linux version of the game server on your server machine, and have everyone connect to that.
    No, NAT is handled by a cisco router. The linux machine is on a fixed IP address and I would like to forward specific ports from it to my windows box. My linux box is a little too slow for game servers.

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    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    Surely then you want to do the forwarding on your cisco router directly to the Windows machine?

    Have you tried running the game server on your Linux machine - it might surprise you. Because your run the dedicated server (i.e. no graphics) then you dont need quite so much ooomph. My NWN server is a Pentium 2 733, with 128Mb RAM, and it copes very nicely.
    Linux user #126863 - see http://linuxcounter.net/

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roxoff
    Surely then you want to do the forwarding on your cisco router directly to the Windows machine?

    Have you tried running the game server on your Linux machine - it might surprise you. Because your run the dedicated server (i.e. no graphics) then you dont need quite so much ooomph. My NWN server is a Pentium 2 733, with 128Mb RAM, and it copes very nicely.
    Yes, I do want to do the forwarding from the cisco router straight to the windows machine. However I cannot, due to the person controlling the router being unwilling to change anything on it nor let anyone else change anything on it.

    The linux dedicated server has some bugs in it that I don't want, and the server can't cope with more than about 12 people in it, while my gaming box runs the server, 31 bots, and the client with no trouble at all (125ish fps on the client.)

    I see no reason why there should not be a simple way of forwarding UDP packets like there is for forwarding TCP (rinetd, ssh tunneling)

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    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    So the ports are already forwarded through the cisco router to the Linux machine? If that's the case, then it's just a matter of configuring IP tables to forward those ports directly to the Windows machine. You're introducing a few more milliseconds of lag, but it shouldn't be a problem. You can specify UDP packet forwarding with IP tables.
    Linux user #126863 - see http://linuxcounter.net/

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roxoff
    So the ports are already forwarded through the cisco router to the Linux machine? If that's the case, then it's just a matter of configuring IP tables to forward those ports directly to the Windows machine. You're introducing a few more milliseconds of lag, but it shouldn't be a problem. You can specify UDP packet forwarding with IP tables.
    I already knew that it could be done that way, I just don't know how.

    I was hoping for something like rinetd's insanely simple config:
    0.0.0.0 28070 192.168.0.31 28070

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    You can't, the Cisco router will most likely drop the packets, if not port forwarded but it depends on the config the "admin" has....
    An Evil way to do it, is to password recovery the box and change the config but you will need to know what you are doing, cisco is no walk in the park there is a specific configuration for port forwarding, but this will raise red flags especially if the box has syslog server...

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    Quote Originally Posted by DNIS
    You can't, the Cisco router will most likely drop the packets, if not port forwarded but it depends on the config the "admin" has....
    An Evil way to do it, is to password recovery the box and change the config but you will need to know what you are doing, cisco is no walk in the park there is a specific configuration for port forwarding, but this will raise red flags especially if the box has syslog server...
    Why can I run servers that use TCP on my windows box using rinetd on the linux box then?

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    It's totally ****ing ridiculous that I should have to read a 200 page iptables manual to learn to forward a single udp port.

    Gaming box IP: 192.168.0.31
    Linux server IP: 69.19.214.183

    An example of a totally working ONE LINE TCP port forward in use for a popular online game. Pictures included:








    As you can clearly see from the screenshots, this WORKS 100%, I have even persuaded someone who was decidedly not from my network to join and it worked for him as well.

    So how do I do the EXACT SAME THING for a UDP port?

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