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I'm pretty new to networking, and this is basically a generic networking question as opposed to a Linux-specific one, but here goes: I currently have port 80 forwarded to my ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Engineer Javasnob's Avatar
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    Personal network DNS


    I'm pretty new to networking, and this is basically a generic networking question as opposed to a Linux-specific one, but here goes:

    I currently have port 80 forwarded to my webserver, so when I type javasnob.homelinux.net in my browser, the default page for my server comes up. So far so good. The thing is, I want it so www.javasnob.homelinux.net goes to my webserver, TheRing.javasnob.homelinux.net goes to my main machine, etc.

    In order to do this, do I need a special feature in my router, or can I tell it to point to a BIND server I have set up, or something other solution I haven't thought of?

    Thanks!
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  2. #2
    Linux Engineer rcgreen's Avatar
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    It depends on whether you are accessing it from inside or outside your
    network. Inside, either you run BIND on one of your machines and point
    your other boxes to use it as the name server. Outside your own network,
    you need to configure the dynamic dns provider, Dyndns or whoever.

  3. #3
    Linux Engineer Javasnob's Avatar
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    This would be from the outside. javasnob.homelinux.net is registered with DynDNS, but I'm not sure how to use DynDNS to manage my personal network.
    Flies of a particular kind, i.e. time-flies, are fond of an arrow.

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  4. #4
    Linux Newbie framp's Avatar
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    That doesn't work. You have ONE external DYNDNS name with one associated IP address. Now you want to be able to access internal hosts which use internale IP addresse (192.168.0.... or 10.0. ...) which cannot be propagated to the outside net.

    The only way I see to get this done would be to set up a VPN.
    "Really, I'm not out to destroy Microsoft. That will just be a completely unintentional side effect." Linus Benedict Torvalds

  5. #5
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    There is another way. It's quite convoluted, so bear with me. Have all your domain addresses (<whatever>.javasnob.homelinux.net) point to your dynamic IP address using your DynDNS service.

    Get your server installed with Apache and set up Virtual Hosts for each machine.

    Make each virtual host point to a NFS-mounted share from the machine in question.

    At least this way, you dont have to run apache on each machine, and have to bolt it down numerous times.
    Linux user #126863 - see http://linuxcounter.net/

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