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My setup; 1 Winodows XP Laptop 1 Windows XP Desktop /w Printer 1 SuSE 10.2 with VMware Guest OS Fedora C5 configured for Apache PHP MySQL 1 Linksys Wirless Router ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    4

    Planing a home network with Lynksis router / enabled for Wirless


    My setup;

    1 Winodows XP Laptop
    1 Windows XP Desktop /w Printer
    1 SuSE 10.2 with VMware Guest OS Fedora C5 configured for Apache PHP MySQL
    1 Linksys Wirless Router -g
    1 10/100/1000 Mbps switch

    Several Questions:

    i) I want to use either SuSE 10.2 or Fedora C5 as the DNS Server /Domain Controler - will later install Samba to manage WindowXP Desktop/ Laptop (if possible)

    ii) HOW would you do this?

    Do I setup DHCP on the Wirless Linskys router since it will be handling Wirless Laptop?

    How would you specify to the router that Linux box is DNS - is it necessary?

    If you suggest that Linux box handles DHCP - how do I disable it on a router (comes authomatically with the firmware)?

    Any suggestions? Interesting links? Tutorials?

  2. #2
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    11

    How to posting may answer some questions

    I recently blogged on how to do this with Cobia (Cobia Community Blog: Using a wireless router with Cobia ) and I think some of the things I discovered during the process may answer at least a couple of your questions. I was working on the same basic configuration, with a Linksys WRT54G hanging off of my system, which is providing DHCP to the wireless network as well as being a firewall.

    In my set up I did the primary configuration of the linksys box from a laptop. I turned off DHCP on the Linksys (wrt54g), configured DHCP on my server for the internal interface. This interface plugs into one of the switched ports on the WRT54G, not the external interface of the WRT54G. The WRT54G I gave a static IP outside of the DHCP scope but in the same subnet and let the server offer up DHCP addresses to the wireless pool.

    By plugging in to the switched ports, your allowing broadcast traffic, such as DHCP request, to be propagated to the server. The WRT54G sees the external interface of itself as a separate network and therefore will not pass DHCP requests. You lose one of the internal ports to your DHCP server, but it doesn't look like that's going to matter in your situation.

    On the WRT54G, there was a check box on the first page of the configuration to turn DHCP off. I don't have access to the interface at the moment, but I think it was part of the basic setup tab.
    Hope this helps,

    Martin

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