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Alot of distobutions have commands where you can setup your X server in order to view your GUI mode, or desktop mode (with the mouse cursor, icons, GUI's).... I'd suggest ...
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  1. #11
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    Alot of distobutions have commands where you can setup your X server in order to view your GUI mode, or desktop mode (with the mouse cursor, icons, GUI's).... I'd suggest seeing if you have a program called:

    xf86config

    To see if you have this... the easiest way is to start typing out the name, then press Tab button twice... and it will list all programs/scripts that start with what you typed: example:

    type: x and then Tab button --> this will list all programs that start with x
    type: xf86 and then Tab button --> this will liast all programs that start with xf86

    Also... what you should know... if you are looking for any configuration files... most likely they will be in the /etc directory, or perhaps in your /home/usrname/.somthing/ directory.

    If you are looking for your XF86Config file... it could possibly be in /etc/X11/ directory.

    If you want the configuration file which selects what window manager or desktop you would like to use (xinitrc for me) ... it could possibly be in /etc/X11/xinitrc/ directory.

    Also for your knowledge:

    /usr - all user programs, librarys, scripts, etc in here (most of the time)

    /home - where users home directory's exist. Kind of like the My Documents directory in windows.

    /etc - configuration files and such.

    /boot - where your kernel exists

    /root - roots home directory

    /sbin - super user binary's... in other words programs that only root can execute.

    /bin - user programs like ls, cp, mv, chmod.

    /tmp - directory where temporary files are stored.

    /mnt - directory where devices such as hard drives, cdroms, floppy drives are mounted.

    I don't think i'm leaving anything out... But I could be...

    So what I would suggest is take a look at what programs you have on your system and find out how to use them by using man 'program name'.

    If you see a directory that says bin/ this is where programs/scripts will be held. then to see what the program does use the manual command (man).

    Good luck.

  2. #12
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    thanks for the nice layout
    Now that Im able to navigate through things, Ill try it all out (as u suggested)

    kind regards

  3. #13
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    hi I simply had to post this:

    My first post to this forum using Netscape Navigator 4.76 from Red Hat Linux (Windows Manager GNOME). Yey!!

  4. #14
    Linux Newbie
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    Congratulations!

    That must be a great feeling, eh?

    Robert Peaslee
    Taking a walk on the wonderful path computers have lain before me

  5. #15
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    yeah, It does feel kinda cool

    --and now we start the journey in linux--

    and btw thanks for the help so far everyone!

  6. #16
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    no problem brotha, we got ya back

  7. #17
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    no problem brotha, we got ya back

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