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I just started reading about scheduling tasks in linux with cron files. I am very new at this so I don't know much. I was just wondering if most people ...
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  1. #1
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    Question about mounting and also about Scripts


    I just started reading about scheduling tasks in linux with cron files. I am very new at this so I don't know much. I was just wondering if most people use cron or some other method to run automated scheduled tasks. I just don't want to be barking up the wrong, deprecated, methods.

    Also I am looking to learn more about Samba, and I'm doing some reading myself right now. I've been reading some posts, and, not to get into details but I am trying to get an overview of how things work. I was just wondering about mounting. Do you mount a windows share directory :P onto a linux system, and then linux will recognize this directory as a usable directory, or do you mount something on the windows side. Who is mounting what? I'd imagine both systems have to be running Samba or something and that is like their protocol...can somebody give me a general, general overview?

  2. #2
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    first question: yes, cron (or fcron, or vixie cron, or some other cron) is the way to do that. Here is my setup (linux from scratch distribution): I have fcron installed. root's crontab has fcron running "run-parts.sh /etc/cron.hourly" every hour, cron.daily every day at 3 am, and cron.weekly every sunday at 4 am. Man crontab will show you how to set this up. fcron doesn't have a system-wide default crontab, vixie cron does. So for fcron I have those commands in root's crontab, if I were using vixie cron I would have that in the system-wide crontab. Then every user has a crontab (edited with `fcrontab -e`). My normal user has a command that will run fetchmail every 10 minutes (stupid fetchmail won't daemonize correctly), and that is about all. I haven't found any thing else I need to do on a regular basis.

    second question: I think you are getting confused. Let me help. SMB is Server Message Block. It is a way for two computers to message each other. Samba both listens and talks on SMB, and windows does the same. When you "mount" a windows share all it is doing is abstracting out the actual talking/listening. It creates a virtual file system, that when you do an "ls" on that directory it actually contacts the other computer, asks for the directory listing, and displays what is returned in some sort of readable fashion. When you try to read/open a file from linux, Samba contacts the windows computer, and says "hey, send me this file". Samba makes your linux application wait that extra second (or minute depending on file size) before displaying the data. So you really aren't doing anything on the windows side besides sending out information. Windows doesn't know (for all purposes) what O/S is requesting this data, just that someone is requesting it over the SMB protocol. Easy enough, eh?
    I respectfully decline the invitation to join your delusion.

  3. #3
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    SAMBA

    I have a small samba network.

    On my server I have created a url link to the following address smb://workgroupname when I open this - nautilus opens the smb domain as if it were network neighbourhood on windows. So accessing files on a windows share ain't no diff to local files through gnome.

    However, to access it through the command line I use a utility which came with samba called smbclient or something like that (haven't used it since testing samba). This is diff and acts more like an ftp client.

    there is something called supermount dunno what it is. just seen it mentioned on the forums. think its for mounting disks accross the network but I'm not sure.
    No trees were harmed during the creation of this message. Its made from a blend of elephant tusk and dolphin meat.

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  5. #4
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    I have a small samba network.

    On my server I have created a url link to the following address smb://workgroupname when I open this - nautilus opens the smb domain as if it were network neighbourhood on windows. So accessing files on a windows share ain't no diff to local files through gnome.
    You are right, this is handled by gnome-vfs. vfs stands for virtual file system, like I said. All it does is communicate over SMB and show you the files in a standard (in this case nautilus) way.
    However, to access it through the command line I use a utility which came with samba called smbclient or something like that (haven't used it since testing samba). This is diff and acts more like an ftp client.
    Yet another virtual file system, this time resembling ftp. They don't need anything fancy, as this is just one implementation of the interface they wrote. They would rather do what you mention next:

    there is something called supermount dunno what it is. just seen it mentioned on the forums. think its for mounting disks accross the network but I'm not sure.
    This is the 'mount' program using the samba interface. This way it mounts the SMB drive, and makes it available to the user in a fashion he/she is used to, like a standard *nix directory, that way ls, cat, grep, cut, etc. all work like they are supposed to.

    Man, all of those sound familiar don't they? Yeah, it is because they are all so close to the same. Isn't it great how writing something correctly makes adding on/interfacing it so easy? Seriously, now that Nautilus has that implemented it will be stable until the Samba interface changes APIs (only happens rarely). And even if it does it won't break any of Nautilus' original functionality and it will allow easy maintenance. This is a good example of designing a product using the adapter pattern
    I respectfully decline the invitation to join your delusion.

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