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I think this would be a project to force me to learn everything about linux and other various things with computers, I'm a newbie, but I have google at my ...
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  1. #1
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    Question Linux From Scratch -- Newb able to do it?


    I think this would be a project to force me to learn everything about linux and other various things with computers, I'm a newbie, but I have google at my finger tips so I feel confident in that sort of way.

    I'd be using this tutorial:
    LFS Project Homepage

    I just want to start something where I'd be able to slowly figure out misc. things, something that would force me to read random wiki articles on the problems I'd get to, etc.

    Is there another rout to go that may be a little better? Or should I just try out my luck?

    I'm sure it's going to take a LONG time lol

  2. #2
    oz
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    Welcome to the forums!

    We are all different. There are some new users that will accomplish it much easier than others, and maybe some that will never be able to do it.

    You should give it a try and see how it goes.
    oz

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    I figured with google anything can be done. I figured it'll give me things to think "Wtf?" about, so I can google, and learn.. like a starting point for wiki articles.

    I've already been reading so much, it's like I keep on going in circles with nothing to really research

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  5. #4
    oz
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    I've never done LFS myself, but I've heard it's best if you have a dedicated machine for it because it can take a very long while to complete.

    Let us know how you get along with it.
    oz

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    I'm dedicating a desktop for it. Yeah, I heard it took this one guy two years or so. lol Hopefully It'll give me a good solid starting point for really truely knowing how linux works

  7. #6
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
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    If you are using Linux first time then I would suggest to install any Linux distro first and learn its in and outs.

    1. Ubuntu/Fedora/Suse/Mandriva
    2. Slackware/Arch/Crux
    3. Gentoo
    4. LFS
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  8. #7
    Linux Guru bigtomrodney's Avatar
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    I agree dc, it would be pretty difficult and unnecessarily time consuming to try and understand compilation and services if you haven't a least tried to use Linux before hand. The start of your learning curve will be learning your way around as a user and as such LFS might not be the greatest idea. For instance, how do you decide to add a component if you have no idea how to use it or how it runs?

  9. #8
    Linux Engineer Freston's Avatar
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    Everyone is different, so if you feel this is a good way to learn a system, then by all means give it a try.

    Keep in mind however that LFS assumes basic knowledge of the command line and the Linux system in general. You will have to wrap your mind around different concepts as partitions, filesystems and mountpoints, runlevels, flat-text configuration files, an environment where your in- and external devices are files and the like....

    ... concepts you just cannot know when you're used to a Windows environment. Concepts also, that may prove easier to understand when they are put together as a working system.





    That is not to say it's a bad idea. If you decide to go through with it, I applaud you for your persistence. Why don't you build a Slackware or Debian system (or Arch or Crux, or etcetera) and build LFS alongside that on a different partition?
    Can't tell an OS by it's GUI

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