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there is a current thread on text editors in the coffe lounge called 'vi v emacs' they are probably the 2 most common text based editors, but they are difficult ...
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  1. #11
    Linux Guru kkubasik's Avatar
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    there is a current thread on text editors in the coffe lounge called 'vi v emacs' they are probably the 2 most common text based editors, but they are difficult to learn at first, so get into a comfortable linux enviroment before trying them. nano is a breed of pico, and midnigh commander has a text editor. su is a command type it in then press enter and you will be prompted for your root password, then when you have enterd it, you become root untill you type exit , then you become a normal user again. It a handy safety feature. One of Windows primary safty flaws is that everything is by default done in the administrative account, by only using root when nessicary, you protect yourself.
    Avoid the Gates of Hell. Use Linux
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  2. #12
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    Code:
    id:3:initdefault:
    Tells Linux to boot up in multi-user mode, starting normal all services except X.
    Code:
    id:4:initdefault:
    Tells Linux to boot up in multiuser mode, starting all normal services including X.
    The display manager used is determined by /etc/rc.d/rc.4. It's a script that looks for a dm and starts the first one it finds. By default, it looks for GDM first, KDM second and XDM last. If you want to by-pass GDM and go to KDM, you'll need to open /etc/rc.d/rc.4 in an editor(with root privelege) and comment out the section dealing with GDM. (comment out=put a pound sign(#) at the start of the line)
    su=switch user. Use this when logged in to one user account but you need to access another account. If su is followed by a user name(ie. su james) and you have that users password, you will gain access to that users account.
    If su is not followed by a user name, bash assumes root is the account you want to access. So, when I say "su to root", I'm saying that, at a command line, enter su and, when asked, the root password to gain root privelege in that console or terminal.
    On editors, I prefer Midnight Commander's built in editor, mcedit. I use it primarily because it made sense to me when I was a n00b and it still does everything I need it to.
    To open a file using mcedit with root privelege just:
    Code:
    su
    Password&#58;<root's password goes here>
    mcedit /etc/rc.d/rc.4
    Of course, that assumes the file you want to edit is /etc/rc.d/rc.4. You'd want to use the path and file name of the file you actually want to edit.
    When you've finished making the needed changes, simply hit F2 to save the changes and F10 to exit.
    OH NOOOOO!!!!!! You did it the way I said?

  3. #13
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    When I type init 4, GDM comes up just fine. But how would I get back to 'dos' (or whatever it's called, command?). When I exit XFce for example, it just goes back to the GDM login. Also, how would I shutdown? There is no shutdown option (from what I can see) on the GDM like there is for WinXP. I could only exit fluxbox and XFce (again, I may be missing something). I have to login to Gnome just to shut down. lol

    Also, I could not find /etc/inittab while in XFce. An when I typed in
    Code:
    pico /etc/inittab
    into the command (before starting X), I got a 'you don't have sufficient permissions' message and I was logined as root! What gives?


    DrCR


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  4. #14
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    What you're calling "DOS" is the Linux command line interface(CLI).
    To shut down X and return to the CLI, open a terminal, su to root and enter
    Code:
    init 3
    Have you tried to edit /etc/inittab with mcedit? I'm not familliar with pico but I can see no reason why you wouldn't be able to edit it with root priveleges.
    OH NOOOOO!!!!!! You did it the way I said?

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by U-Turn
    What you're calling "DOS" is the Linux command line interface(CLI).
    Cool deal, thanks.

    Quote Originally Posted by U-Turn
    To shut down X and return to the CLI, open a terminal, su to root and enter
    Code:
    init 3
    Yeah, I just though of that this morning. Thanks!

    I have no clue what's up in referene to /etc/inittab. I'll have to try again and use mcedit.

    On the side, if I'm in X can I use something like abiword or a program like that to edit config files? Am I correct in assuming I can do so w/o any possible ramification compared to using a non-X editor? I guess you would have to be in init3 mod to edit any X related config files and therefore have to use a non-X editor for such tasks.


    Quote Originally Posted by U-Turn
    As for the color, I don't know. I know it's possible but I use a LiLo boot image instead of the stock text login.
    You mean picture when you said image? How would I set something like this up?


    DrCR


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  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrCR
    On the side, if I'm in X can I use something like abiword or a program like that to edit conOn the side, if I'm in X can I use something like abiword or a program like that to edit config files? Am I correct in assuming I can do so w/o any possible ramification compared to using a non-X editor? I guess you would have to be in init3 mod to edit any X related config files and therefore have to use a non-X editor for such tasks.
    fig files? Am I correct in assuming I can do so w/o any possible ramification compared to using a non-X editor? I guess you would have to be in init3 mod to edit any X related config files and therefore have to use a non-X editor for such tasks.
    You can use whatever editor(gedit, kate, kwrite, etc.) without any problems so long as the editor is running with root privelege.
    Quote Originally Posted by DrCR
    You mean picture when you said image? How would I set something like this up?
    Yes. You can apply a .bmp image to Lilo by following the instructions in the Lilo docs. They'll be found at /usr/share/doc/lilo<ver#>)
    OH NOOOOO!!!!!! You did it the way I said?

  7. #17
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    Awesome, thanks!

    Just a few final questions, at least I'm pretty sure, for this thread. How do I shut down while in the CLI? I'm just using Ctrl+Alt+Del right now.

    How would I shutdown while in XFce for example (I only know of a 'logout' option)? I can pull up something like xterm I know, so perhaps the answer to the first question will be applicable to this question as well.

    And in closing, is it possible to add a shutdown button to GDM (or does one exist that I am not familiar with?)? Something similar to the WinXP's login.


    Thanks for your faithful help U-Turn!


    DrCR


    _____________

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrCR
    How do I shut down while in the CLI? I'm just using Ctrl+Alt+Del right now.
    su to root and
    Code:
    shutdown -h now
    Or
    Code:
    halt
    Or
    Code:
    init 0
    Quote Originally Posted by DrCR
    How would I shutdown while in XFce for example (I only know of a 'logout' option)?
    Open a terminal(xterm, rxvt etc.) and do the above.
    Quote Originally Posted by DrCR
    And in closing, is it possible to add a shutdown button to GDM (or does one exist that I am not familiar with?)?
    Open the gdm configurator, as root, with:
    Code:
    gdm-setup
    Under one of the tabs(sorry, running PCLinuxOS ATM and don't have GDM handy) you'll see "Users may shut down". Check that box and there will be a shutdown button added to GDM.
    OH NOOOOO!!!!!! You did it the way I said?

  9. #19
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    Sweetness, thanks U-Turn!

    DrCR. out.

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