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I have been using Ubuntu for some time now, I think that I am ready to change to a more advanced distro. I was thinking of going to gentoo to ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Newbie Geeth's Avatar
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    Thinking of going to gentoo


    I have been using Ubuntu for some time now, I think that I am ready to change to a more advanced distro. I was thinking of going to gentoo to see how I go.

    I have read through the handbook and have a basic understanding of what I am going to be up for. I have tried this once before on a spare pc and had issues with grub, Got frustrated (and drunk) and instead decided to install bsd.

    But back to the topic... My pc that I want to do this install on currently is a duel boot with Ubuntu and Xp. I am wondering what the best way to do the gentoo install would be.

    I am thinking that I should resize a partition (i have heaps of free space) and install on the new empty partion that is created. After the install is done (hopefully sucessfully) instead of installing grub again, just reconfig the menu.lst and add gentoo to the list. So I have a linux boot while I get gentoo up and running (mainly getting the atheros card running)

    The main thing that I am wondering, is if I go the way above and decide that I want to go fully to gentoo and gid rid of ubuntu and delete the ubuntu partition, would I have to reinstall grub or would it just need a menu.lst in the /boot of gentoo?

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    I suggest you follow the handbook and emerge grub ... just don't install it. I think its /boot/grub/grub.conf file rather than /boot/grub/menu.lst

    If you decide to go for Gentoo and ditch Ubuntu then all you need to do is re-install grub ... which you can try before you ditch Ubuntu anyway with
    Code:
    sudo grub
    root (hd0,3) # assume sda4 as boot partition or Gentoo root if not using a separate boot partition
    setup (hd0)
    quit
    I used a live CD for my last Gentoo install ... I only used the Gentoo CD to run mirrorselect ... but you can sort that out manually as well
    ... and if you decide to use genkernel make sure you put valid entries in fstab first otherwise it throws a wobbler

  3. #3
    Linux Newbie Geeth's Avatar
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    i was thinking of using the genkernel becuase of inexperience with configuring a kernel.
    I will try to remember to do the fstab first.
    I think I will be using the minimal install disk, just so I have lastest packages etc.

    For using the word 'wobbler'

    Thankfully I have a quiet day at work and should have plenty of time to browse the handbook.

  4. #4
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geeth View Post
    I think I will be using the minimal install disk, just so I have lastest packages etc.
    I dont think it matters what you use to install from ... you download a tarball and update the system as part of the install process anyway.

    Using a live CD like Ubuntu means you have a GUI available while you do the install. If you use the minimal install CD then web browsing is via Links only until you build a GUI (you can get by on it but after a GUI it sucks). I have tried Gentoo live CD, Gentoo minimal CD, chroot from existing hard drive Linux and install from Ubuntu live CD ... of which I prefer the Ubuntu live CD for the install - but must admit I used Ubuntu I had installed for most of the GUI emerge process

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    You don't need to boot from a livecd if you have ubuntu already installed.

    Just open an xterm and do it there. You only need some free space for the Gentoo partition(s). This way you will have a working connection and your GUI programs ready for anything that you need.

  6. #6
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by i92guboj View Post
    You don't need to boot from a livecd if you have ubuntu already installed.
    I agree you don't need to use a live CD ... but if you mistype things (apart from partition formating) then your existing install is safe because the partitions are not mounted. For a first install attempt I would use a live CD ... but thats just my opinion ... I've tried a few ways and the live CD worked best for me

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    Linux Newbie Geeth's Avatar
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    hmmm, thats given be a bit to think about.
    I think I might go for the live cd then. Though I am not to sure the way that going from a ubuntu disk works. But I will have a look into.
    Mind you, working in command line for a while isn't an issue really.

    I agree about the not having current partitions mounted. I don't wanna mess any of that up.

    While be a long night I think

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan183 View Post
    I agree you don't need to use a live CD ... but if you mistype things (apart from partition formating) then your existing install is safe because the partitions are not mounted. For a first install attempt I would use a live CD ... but thats just my opinion ... I've tried a few ways and the live CD worked best for me
    I don't get your point. There's absolutely the same chance to format the wrong partition in a live system or from a livecd.

    In fact, it's the other way around... You can't format partitions that are mounted, fsck will not let you do that. On the contrary, nothing will stop you if you try to format the wrong partition from a livecd.

    This is not something experimental that I just invented. It's specified in the handbook as an alternate install method, or at least it has always been documented there until the last time I checked.

    It's just a matter of choice, however... For me it's just convenient to have your system working, so you don't have to wait two days to be able to do real work.

  9. #9
    Linux Newbie Geeth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by i92guboj View Post

    This is not something experimental that I just invented. It's specified in the handbook as an alternate install method, or at least it has always been documented there until the last time I checked.
    yeah it's in there

  10. #10
    Linux Guru Jonathan183's Avatar
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    OK - what I do is use the partitioner on the Ubuntu live CD to create/format the partitions ... create mount points etc. My point is the only time your existing install is in danger with this approach is while you create & format partitions (for which I use the GUI).

    No risk of copying tarball to the wrong location and overwriting data on the existing install (because the partition is not mounted). No risk of overwriting existing grub when emerging grub, no risk of editing existing config files etc.

    My original point was that using the minimal install CD was not the best option for me, and have tried to explain why. There are pros and cons to each approach ...

    Ed: from my post #4 ... I have tried chroot from an existing install as well - there just seemed to be lots of opportunities to mess up the existing install working that way.

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