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I am essentially a new user with Linux and I am having a bit of problems uninstalling stuff from my computer. I am using Mandrake 9.0 and when I remove ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined!
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    Removing Applications...


    I am essentially a new user with Linux and I am having a bit of problems uninstalling stuff from my computer. I am using Mandrake 9.0 and when I remove something using RPMDRAKE it still leaves a file in the usr Root Directory. When I try to get rid of it, it says access denied. How can I remove this? Thank you.

  2. #2
    Linux Newbie
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    Are you trying to remove the file as root or a regular user? If you are not root this could be the cause of the permissions issue.
    [ [ SykkN alloc ] initWithThePowerTo: destroyYouAll ];
    /* Don\'t make me use it! */

  3. #3
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    I am doing it as the root. I am the only user on the OS. I am the default admin. Atleast I think so....

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  5. #4
    Linux Guru
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    Being the only user doesn't mean that you are root. You can see whether you're root or not by looking at your shell prompt. If it ends with "#", you're root, and if it ends with "$", you're an ordinary user.

  6. #5
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    Yes.. I am the root. I have a # next to my name. But how can I get rid of something in the usr Root Directory? Thank you.

  7. #6
    Linux Guru
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    What do you mean by the "usr Root Directory"? Are you referring to /usr? What have you been doing in your attempts to remove it up until now?

  8. #7
    Linux User
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    do a
    Code:
    rpm -qa | grep application
    there you will the full application name(s) which you can use in uninstalling. so, now do a
    Code:
    rpm -e applicationname
    or maybe
    Code:
    rpm -e `rpm -qa | grep application`
    ?

    that will uninstall programs. you might want to consult "man rpm" for more info

  9. #8
    Linux Engineer
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    The shell prompt can be changed (PS1) so $ for a normal user or # for root isnt always correct. Verify the permissions on the file, make sure that root has write permissions on the file... should look like this

    -rw-rw-r-- root sys <filename>

    Otherwise change the permissions like this:

    Change owner and group
    Code:
    chown root&#58;sys <filename>
    Change permissions
    Code:
    chmod 660 <filename>
    Regards

    Regards

    Andutt

  10. #9
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    Please excuse my ignorance, but can someone explain to me what a shell prompt is? Also, I have no clue what the andutt meant by rw-rw-r-- root sys <filename>. I am very sorry, but I am new to Linux and trying to get a feel for it.

  11. #10
    Linux Engineer
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    If you start a terminal, for example xterm you will se something that looks like this:

    test@superman$>:

    That called a shell prompt, you can change the appearence of this prompt if you want so it for an example showing where you sre standing in the filesystem like this:

    test@superman#/home/test>:

    Thats what Dolda mean if you have a # sign in you shellprompt you are running as the root user, you can also use the command:

    Code:
    id or whoami
    to see which user you are and what groups you are included in.

    Filepermissions on file or directory are saying which users and groups who are granted to perfrom certain things on the file/directory. It can look like this:

    -rwxrwxrwx

    If you start an xterm and type the command:

    Code:
    ls -l
    You will se this files and directory in you homedirectory and which permissions they have, and which user and group that are "owning" the file.

    r stands for readpermission
    w stands for writepermission
    x stands for executepermission

    as you can see with the ls -l command there are 10 permission positions

    -rwx the first section tells what permissions the owner of the file should have
    -rwxrwx the second section tells what permissions the groupowner of the file should have.
    -rwxrwxrwx the third section tells what permission every other users should have.


    You can alter this permissions with the chmod and chown command. Type

    Code:
    man chmod
    or
    man chown
    For more information about thoose commands, ..

    Regards

    Regards

    Andutt

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