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I have been a Windows Administrator for years as an occupation. I have been using a Mac at home since Vista came out. I would like to create a home ...
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  1. #1
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    I have been a Windows Administrator for years as an occupation. I have been using a Mac at home since Vista came out. I would like to create a home network using Virtual servers and Linux. Right now I have a Windows 2003 Server set as the Domain Controller and a Web/Application Server. But I want to go all Open Source and would like to add more controlls to monitor what my kids are doing on the internet.
    Any advice on distributions I should be using and documetation on how to do it would be great. I have not looked in to it to hard but really want to expand into the Linux world but need to make sure that everything I set up can support my Mac and my one Windows XP system I use for work.
    Thanks in advance for your assistance

    Dru

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    Ubuntu is a great distrobution for crossing over from Windows... I didn't follow you on what you are asking here, but if you are looking for a solution that will allow you to Virtualize different OS's the take a look at Sun's free VM server. I have a Ubuntu 8.10 machine running several Virtual machines.

    If this isn't what you had in mind post a little more detail and I will try and help if I can.

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    Thank you linlo68 for your responce. Right now I have a the Windows Servers running and i would like to replace them with Linux servers. I have never even thought of this before but really want to jump over and learn Linux. I am looking for Linux Distributions that I can use that would replace my Windows Domain Controller and Web/App Servers.
    Another thing I was thinking about doing is Creating a few Virtual Servers so I can play around with some other stuff. I am new to the linux world so hopefully my Microsoft talk can be forgiven, but i would alos like to figure out a way to do a Roaming Profile type Service for all 5 of my kids, my wife and myself. This way it wouldn't matter which computer was available any of the kids could jump on it and it would be the same profile that they use on all the other computers.
    I guess my plan is to get rid of all my Windows machines (Except the one I use for work) and go full Linux.

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    No problem... I know how frustrating it can be when you are looking for an answer to a question and not sure what terminolgy to use. I too cut my teeth in IT on Windows...

    The first thing you really need to understand is linux servers do not function in the same manner as Windows servers do... They are all stand alone unless they are in some sort of array. You can configure all of you linux servers to leverage LDAP for user authentication though. This illiminates the need to create the same user account on all of your systems.

    Each system user has his/her one "profile" so to speak. These are usually stored under /home/<USERID>. This is where linux keeps track of all of that users settings... ie desktop, background, profile options. In linux files are hidden by placing a . (period) in front of the file name. You are able to view these files with the following command ls -a

    I good starting point it to try and locate a document that has been floating around the internet for some time, which basically translates most Microsoft tasks in to linux commands. I can't remember the name of the document but I think if you google it useing Microsoft to linux you will get a hit.

    Ubuntu is in my opinion a very good distrobution to start with. It is based on the Red Hat/Fedorra distrobution but simplifies a lot of the user tasks. It has some of the same features that Windows does such as system update and also has a very nice package (software) installation utility that is easy to use.

    When you get close to starting your project let me know and I will help you where I can.

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    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by linlo68 View Post
    Ubuntu is in my opinion a very good distrobution to start with. It is based on the Red Hat/Fedorra distrobution but simplifies a lot of the user tasks. It has some of the same features that Windows does such as system update and also has a very nice package (software) installation utility that is easy to use.
    Ubuntu is actually based on Debian, not Red Hat or Fedora.

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    I'm sorry, reed9 is correct... I was thinking of CentOS. Thanks Reed9.

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    Linlo68-
    Thank you for the information, and about the mistake reed9 pointed out, I am sure pretty sune I will understand what that means but as of right now that means nothing to me.

    I did find this and was looking at it. Windows-to-Linux roadmap: Overview
    I feel like I am a computer idiot right now.

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    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
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    CentOS, Ubuntu, Redhat, Fedora, etc, are all names of different linux distributions. Since a big part of open source is sharing code and work, many distros use other distros as their foundation to build on, rather than rewrite everything themselves from scratch. There are a few main distros that are not based on anything else, Debian, Redhat, Slackware, and so on. Ubuntu is based on Debian, Fedora is the community version of Redhat, an enterprise oriented distro. As far as actually using them, there are a lot of similarities, but each does things a little differently. A lot of people find they prefer one way of doing things. I personally find the Debian way much more intuitive and easy for me. (Actually, I prefer Arch Linux to either.) Other people swear by Redhat/Fedora.

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    reed9,
    Thank you very much for the information. I was playing around this weekend and set up a couple of Virtual Machines, I set up an Ubuntu and a Fedora to see how it is. Ubuntu seamed a little more user friendly for me. I do see some similaties between Ubuntu and Windows. I appreciate the asistance and will keep you posted on my progress and hopefully be able to pick some brains on this project of mine.
    After this weekend though I need to make the ability to monitor my 13 year olds interent traffic easier...

  10. #10
    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
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    You might want to look at Linux Mint 6. It's based on Ubuntu with a number of extra tools included. One such is called nintNanny.

    One of the features Mint has been lacking as a family desktop is the ability for parents to prevent their children from accessing certain websites. Parental control is easy to set up in Microsoft Windows and we got a lot of feedback from people who migrated to Linux and who missed this feature. Of course one could install DansGuardian and a few other packages but it’s not easy, it usually requires the use of a proxy and it’s also quite complex to configure. For Linux Mint 6 we came with a compromise and we decided to implement a minimal set of features but to make it as trivial to use as possible. So here comes mintNanny.
    Main Page - Linux Mint

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