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This probably sounds like a dumb question, but I have a development board that I want to write applications for that is running on Linux. The manufacturer gave me a ...
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  1. #1
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    Developing embedded linux on Windows


    This probably sounds like a dumb question, but I have a development board that I want to write applications for that is running on Linux. The manufacturer gave me a bunch of Windows tools for working with it (it also has WinCE software). All of the instructions use Hyperterminal for communicating with the bootloader, but if I want to write a C program to run under Linux, don't I have to write it from a Linux host using a cross compiler for my board which has an ARM processor? Or can you cross compile from the Windows environment? I don't want to have to build in Linux, mail myself a copy of the file to use with Windows tools to download the app to the development board. If I need to develop on Linux, is there a Hyperterminal like program that runs in Linux? What cross compiler do I use for the ARM processor? Too many questions I know!
    Thanks for your help.

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    You might be able to cross-compile for Linux in Windows using the Cygwin environment and GNU compiler suite; however, it would probably be better to install VirtualBox on your Windows system, and run a Linux distribution which would have the development tools you need in a virtual machine.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    Linux Enthusiast Bemk's Avatar
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    I do not recommend cygwin for this kind of work, as to what I have read it is more of a layer of libraries which makes the linux code compatible with the windows OS after recompiling. Cygwin apps won't work under linux, as Linux apps won't work under cygwin. It is only when the Linux app is compiled under Windows in cygwin the application can run in cygwin.

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bemk View Post
    I do not recommend cygwin for this kind of work, as to what I have read it is more of a layer of libraries which makes the linux code compatible with the windows OS after recompiling. Cygwin apps won't work under linux, as Linux apps won't work under cygwin. It is only when the Linux app is compiled under Windows in cygwin the application can run in cygwin.
    That's irrelevant when cross-compiling code for another target architecture. In such a case, the GNU compiler suite will not be generating code for the Windows environment. I do know of people who have built linux-compatible libraries and executables for non-Windows systems, but I have not had personal experience myself doing so. So, generally I would agree that using Cygwin for this sort of work is not optimal, but that is not the same thing as saying it is either impossible or impracticable.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    Linux Enthusiast Bemk's Avatar
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    Then I made a small mistake. That means I'm human right?
    I now see, that indeed when cross-compiling it makes no difference. Though I still don't think Cygwin is a good choice for the job.

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rubberman View Post
    You might be able to cross-compile for Linux in Windows using the Cygwin environment and GNU compiler suite; however, it would probably be better to install VirtualBox on your Windows system, and run a Linux distribution which would have the development tools you need in a virtual machine.
    I agree that it (Cygwin) isn't the best choice for the job, which is why I recommended using a real Linux tool set in a virtual machine if the user has to host from a Windows system. However, in the past I have found that Cygwin is an adequate (not optimal) Windows environment for development of Linux applications and libraries, provided you recompile them on the target system. I used to use it for that all the time before reliable (and free) VM technology was available. Now that I can reliably run Windows, Solaris, and various Linux distributions under VirtualBox on my CentOS 5 development system, I don't use Cygwin much other than to have Linux tools in the Windows environment.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  7. #7
    Linux Enthusiast Bemk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rubberman View Post
    I agree that it (Cygwin) isn't the best choice for the job, which is why I recommended using a real Linux tool set in a virtual machine if the user has to host from a Windows system. However, in the past I have found that Cygwin is an adequate (not optimal) Windows environment for development of Linux applications and libraries, provided you recompile them on the target system. I used to use it for that all the time before reliable (and free) VM technology was available. Now that I can reliably run Windows, Solaris, and various Linux distributions under VirtualBox on my CentOS 5 development system, I don't use Cygwin much other than to have Linux tools in the Windows environment.
    And running Linux tools under Windows, is what Cygwin is meant for, as far as I know.

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