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Greetings, As soon will be apparent, I am (as usual) in WAY over my head. I NEED to recover files from a SimpleShare 500GB NAS which suddenly, and unaccountably, stopped ...
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  1. #1
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    How to mount usb hdd formatted with reiserfs?


    Greetings, As soon will be apparent, I am (as usual) in WAY over my head. I NEED to recover files from a SimpleShare 500GB NAS which suddenly, and unaccountably, stopped showing me a huge number of files. Turns out that the (Hitachi) hdd in the NAS is formatted resierfs (new to me, but I believe it to be a linux format)

    BTW, what, if any, is the relationship between reiserfs and Ext formats?

    I have opened the case, removed the drive and connected it to an ide to usb connector, but it does not show on the desktop. In my Ubuntu 9.04 computer, when I click on Places/Computer, it shows a USB Drive with a little red circle with a white design of some sort within over the little hardware logo in front of the words, "USB Drive". When I click on the "USB Drive", a 2 line message pops up saying:

    "Unable to mount location"
    "Can't mount file"

    I can remember back several versions of Ubuntu ago, when Ubunutu almost never recognized USB hdd's, that you had to find the drive designator (e.g. sba or hdb or something like this) using some command like fdisk or fstab or the like, then make a directory entry, then mount it. My memory on this is very hazy and the Googling I have done so far has not led me to a reasonably simple explanation of the process.

    Could some kind soul please step me through the process of getting the (now USB) hdd to show up so I can see whether or not there are any files there. Your kindness in explaining what each step is doing will be much appreciated. I intend to make a record of this process so that I can refer to it in future if needed.

    If the reiserfs format is going to complicate this process, then if someone could kindly hold my hand through this complication, I would be eternally grateful. (My wife has just completed a gigantic documents scanning exercise while I was away, saving it directly to the NAS rather than her computer, so rather than just losing the backup, we may have lost the originals, if the drive cannot be read.) TIA.

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    You need to install (possibly) the reiser file system tools, drivers, etc. Also, the version of the rfs it has is important. In any case, if you put the drive in a USB enclosure, attach it to your system, if you have the reiser tools installed, it should automount. If that doesn't work, then you can (assuming you have installed the appropriate tools) manually mount it. I used reiser on a couple of my old systems without problems, though these days I am still using ext3 instead, ever since Hans Reiser was convicted of doing away with his wife...
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  3. #3
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    Hello Rubberman,

    I used Synaptic to look for reiserf tool and it showed it to be already installed, so I don't know why it isn't auto-mounting.

    Manually mounting it is what I want to do, but how do I go about it?

  4. #4
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Create a mount point - an empty directory - where you want to access it. For example, "mkdir /mnt/usb1". Then you can mount the drive there. Before you connect the drive, check for the current drive entries in /dev. Ie, "ls /dev/sd?" This will list the current hard drive devices that are connected to the system. Then, turn on and plug in the USB drive. After a few seconds, you will see the drive access light flicker. Then, run "ls /dev/sd?" again. You should see another device in the system. That is the one that you want to use. Next, check the configuration of that drive with the command "fdisk -l /dev/sdx" where 'x' is the letter of the USB drive. That will show the contents of the partition table. Finally, you will be able to mount it with, "mount /dev/sdx1 /mnt/usb1". If that fails, you might need the type option to the mount command (this has to be done as root, or preceeded with "sudo") - "sudo mount -t reiserfs /dev/sdx1 /mnt/usb1". Anyway, it has been a long while (about 3 years) since I last used the reiser file system, so the type name may not be currently correct. The process is correct, however.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  5. #5
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    The hdd that I want to see the files in is sdb

    Here is the result of fdisk:

    "fdisk -l /dev/sdb
    Cannot open /dev/sdb"

    Does the reiserf capablility of the computer need to be activated somehow?

  6. #6
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    If it is in /dev/sdb, then "fdisk -l /dev/sdb" should show the partitions. Since you are getting the message "Unable to open /dev/sdb" then either it has not yet been recognized by hald (the part of the OS that handles hot-pougged devices), so either the drive is not being recognized by the OS, or you need to wait a bit longer for the system to find it. BTW, how do you know for sure that it is /dev/sdb?
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  7. #7
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    I ran gparted and it shows
    /dev/sda (465.76GiB) and the partitions are the ones I know to be the ones for this computer, and
    /dev/sdb (465.76GiB) so I take it to mean that this is the hdd in question

    BTW, I clicked on File System Support and it shows both reiser4 with all red X's (I take this to mean unsupported) and reiserfs with all green checks (presume supported). How would I know if this hdd is formatted reiser4 or reiserfs?

    Also I ran fdisk -l which yields:

    "Disk /dev/sda: 500.1 GB, 500107862016 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 60801 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0xaa28aa28

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sda1 * 1 6079 48829536 7 HPFS/NTFS
    /dev/sda2 6080 6322 1951897+ 82 Linux swap / Solaris
    /dev/sda3 6323 7295 7815622+ 83 Linux
    /dev/sda4 7296 13374 48829567+ 5 Extended
    /dev/sda5 7296 12158 39062016 83 Linux
    /dev/sda6 12159 13374 9767488+ 83 Linux

    Disk /dev/sdb: 500.1 GB, 500107862016 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 60801 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x00000000

    Disk /dev/sdb doesn't contain a valid partition table"

    So the sda? corresponds to the partitions shown in gparted and I suppose the usb hdd appears to be sdb, but without a number which may be clarified by the final line.

    You mentioned that maybe I haven't waited long enough. It has been plugged in for several hours now. How long is long enough, or is that one of those unanswerable questions?

    Is there anything else I might try? TIA

  8. #8
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    It appears that your /dev/sdb hasn't been properly set up. Any of the reiser filesystem types (reiser or reiser4) will have a properly configured partition table. I think you are SOL, in this case. If you know that your reiser file system took up the entire disk, then you might be able to restore the partition table and user the reiser tools to restore your data. Don't know, since I don't have the system in hand to verify that assumption.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  9. #9
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    The tech support, in the very brief time I had with them, said that the entire disk is rfs.

  10. #10
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Hmmm. It's possible that they overwrote the partition table (sector 0) when they installed the file system. In this case, automount won't work. You will have to manually mount (assuming the device is /dev/sdb): mount /dev/sdb /mnt/usb1
    Note you might have to include the type option in the mount command (-t reiser or -t reiserfs).
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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