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hi, i'm a java developer and i've always developed in a windows environment. am out of work and buffing up my skills as i hunt for a job. i have ...
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  1. #1
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    Q for pro developers


    hi, i'm a java developer and i've always developed in a windows environment. am out of work and buffing up my skills as i hunt for a job.

    i have a question: when a shop says they do their java development in a linux environment are they likely using some kind of shell like ubuntu and installing developer tools and such through their desktop or are things still done old school w/ pkgadd?

    sorry for being a nix noob.

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer Kloschüssel's Avatar
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    shell <> ubuntu ??
    install through desktop <> pkgadd ??

    Furthermore I don't understand what this has to do with a development in a linux environment. And who is Q (I know two, but that would be either a "Kuh", which is the german pronounciation of Q or the Star Trek guy)? Please explain yourself better. It seems I am not the only one that didn't understand what your thread is up to.

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    A lot of Linux java shops use Eclipse or other IDE's for Java development. And as Klos asked, what does pkgadd have to do with anything? It is a Solaris package management tool, used to install application packages on systems. There are several for Linux, depending upon the distribution. Red Hat / CentOS / Fedora use yum and rpm. Ubuntu and other Debian-based distributions use apt-get or synaptic. Gentoo uses emerge. In any case, they have about zero to do with the development process itself.
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    Linux Guru Cabhan's Avatar
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    You seem to have some terminology confusion.

    Ubuntu is not a shell. In the *nix world, a shell refers to the commandline interface and its associated language. Nowadays, most people use Bash (the Bourne Again Shell), which is derived from sh (the Bourne Shell). Historically, there were also csh (the C Shell), ksh (Korn Shell), etc. Ubuntu, on the other hand, is a Linux distribution. This is a set of software that comes packaged together, with a particular philosophy of use and means of installing new software. Ubuntu is itself based on Debian, which means it uses the apt-get software to install new packages.

    Almost everybody running Linux these days uses a distribution. This could be Ubuntu, Red Hat, Gentoo, Slackware, etc. When they install software, it may be through the package manager (apt-get, rpm, portage, etc.) or by compiling the code from source.

    In any case, this has nothing to do with being a developer, unless you are learning how to package your own software. If you were to work for a company that uses Linux, they would likely set up your Linux environment for you and provide you with the software you need.

  5. #5
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kloschüssel View Post
    And who is Q (I know two, but that would be either a "Kuh", which is the german pronounciation of Q or the Star Trek guy)?
    Q is probably question which is nowhere as cool as the Star Trek guy!

    Quote Originally Posted by fashoom View Post
    hi, i'm a java developer and i've always developed in a windows environment. am out of work and buffing up my skills as i hunt for a job. .
    The two main Java development IDE's (that I know of) in Linux are Netbeans and Eclipse. Both of which are also available in the Windows world. They should both be available in the repositories of the distro you end up choosing.
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  6. #6
    Linux Engineer Kloschüssel's Avatar
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    eclipse is just a java app. download it, unpack it, run it. the latest versions of it are still the best and repository maintainers just can't keep up with that time. if you want it nicely installed get familiar with the /opt/ directory and the update-alternatives tool.

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