Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 9 of 9
I have Ubuntu 10.04 as the only os on a 200GB hard drive. what is the best partitioning strategy for a home user? Should I have just one partition, or ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Linux Engineer MASONTX's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Mason Texas
    Posts
    934

    nujinni, hard drive partition strategy


    I have Ubuntu 10.04 as the only os on a 200GB hard drive. what is the best partitioning strategy for a home user? Should I have just one partition, or should I create multiple partitions?

  2. #2
    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    4,651
    I would recommend having a separate /home partition. That way, if you decide to a try a different distro, or want to upgrade with a clean install, you easily can without having to overwrite your personal files and settings.

    My basic partition layout for home use is
    / = 10-15 GB
    Swap = 2 times RAM up to 1 GB (I never use suspend features)
    /home = the rest

    With the exception of my netbook, which only has an 8 GB SSD drive. It does not get a separate /home and has /tmp mounted to a ramdisk.

  3. #3
    Linux Engineer nujinini's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    1,272
    Generally, I would agree with the partitioning scheme of reed9!

    But if I may share, I have also personally experienced the advantage of having a separate partition just in case I want to encrypt said partitions to keep my private files. Although they can also encrypt /home if they choose to. Some users I heard even have separate partitions for their multimedia files as well.

    Since the HD is 200 G, it might be prudent to make a separate partition (20G) for back-up just in case the owner might have a need for temporary storage of files that needs to be saved.

    In the end, it would be up to the user to decide on what partitioning scheme would work best for him or her. Any will do if it works for you. One of the facets of the beauty of this beast (linux)

    Thanks guys!

    nujinini
    linux forums engineer
    nujinini
    Linux User #489667

  4. #4
    Linux User
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    France
    Posts
    292
    My two cents :

    I have found it useful to keep a second 10-15 GB partition for installing the next release of the linux distro. I have always been deceived by upgrades. I usually install the latest release on the separate partition and by the time I have finished configuring the new release and installing any user programs, the previous release is always available and fully functional.
    0 + 1 = 1 != 2 <> 3 != 4 ...
    Until the camel can pass though the eye of the needle.

  5. #5
    Linux Engineer MASONTX's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Mason Texas
    Posts
    934
    So putting together the different parts, 10-15 GB for home, 10-15 GB for next distro/trial distros, 20 GB for back up, 2 GB for swap, and the rest for data?

  6. #6
    Linux Engineer nujinini's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    1,272
    Quote Originally Posted by MASONTX View Post
    So putting together the different parts, 10-15 GB for home, 10-15 GB for next distro/trial distros, 20 GB for back up, 2 GB for swap, and the rest for data?
    Sounds good to me.
    nujinini
    Linux User #489667

  7. #7
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Either at home or at work or down the pub
    Posts
    3,488
    I would do that slightly differently.

    Based on a 200GB hard drive

    20GB for main distro (including home directory)
    20GB for second distro (including home directory)

    All distros installed with only a / although, you may want to add a small swap drive depending on the memory you have.

    The rest for data. The data partition would be mounted into a sub-directory of /home/ at boot time using fstab

    There is no point backing up to the same physical drive so I would get an external drive and back up to that.

    Just my $.0.02
    What do we want?
    Time machines!

    When do we want 'em?
    Doesn't really matter does it!?


    Conkybots: Interactive plugins for your Conkys!

  8. #8
    Linux Engineer MASONTX's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Mason Texas
    Posts
    934
    As I understand it, the on drive backup partition wouldn't be for drive failure, but to back up to before doing a version update or major tinkering with your install. That way you don't lose your data if you have an OOPS moment.

  9. #9
    Linux Enthusiast Bemk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Oosterhout-NB, Netherlands
    Posts
    525
    My usual setup on a Linux only box is 1 GB /boot, 20 GB /, 2x RAM (until 1 GB, then 1x RAM) and rest /home.

    This 1 GB boot thing is something I did because of my multi boot systems. I have an external hard drive and some other PC's to do my backups.

    Right now, though, I'm running 9 partitions, which is 3 per OS. (Gotta do something with 500 GB)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •