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Hi. I did originally post this in the servers forum but I think this is too basic to be put there. I am not looking for anyone to provide me ...
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  1. #1
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    Servers for Dummies?


    Hi.

    I did originally post this in the servers forum but I think this is too basic to be put there.

    I am not looking for anyone to provide me with solutions to below because they are quite general but I really could with some reliable and trusted advice on where I can get some information from for the following tasks. I have only used linux as a user and code developer - not as an administrator.

    1. I buy a domain name and I need to point it to a server I have access to that has apache installed. How do I get the domain name to point to the server and how do I set up the server with the right directories etc. to make accessing the site possible.

    2. Let's say I buy a server, I install linux, but then I need to set up user accounts (ALL COMMAND LINE). I supposed the distribution I install may have some bearing on how this is done but are there rules which apply to all flavours.

    Is there a 'linux admin for dummies' resource anywhere that could help me with the above so I can learn how to do the above?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    When you register the domain name, there is dns entry which is the IP you have for your linux box, will be given name.

    you need to have dns configured on your linux box which should do the reverse lookup.

    then you web/mail or whatever you want can be configured.

    I would suggest dont learn and setup server for public domain.

    work on small in-house network, setting up two domains and one client, to test your applications then go for public domain (with some experts help).

  3. #3
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    I agree with sanjeevt that you shouldn't learn on a public server as the risk of being on the receiving of one or more "H4X0RZZZ PwNEd U 4ZZ!!!!!!" is too great.

    If you set up the domain in a local network you can use any domain name such as companyname.local and everything else is the same.

    There are some great howtos on howtoforge.com called "the perfect server". If you Google that along with the name of your chosen Linux distro you should get good results. Now these are how tos so if you want more detail then you'll have to look that up as well.

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  4. #4
    Linux Newbie theNbomr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by andy_wood View Post
    1. I buy a domain name and I need to point it to a server I have access to that has apache installed. How do I get the domain name to point to the server and how do I set up the server with the right directories etc. to make accessing the site possible.
    When the server host is set up, it is assigned a numeric IP. This will come from the authority from which you obtain your connection, and may be either static (unchanging, and you set it in the host configuration), or dynamic (you set up the host to use BOOTP/DHCP to find its own IP). The Domain Name is a human-readable alias for the numeric IP. Either the organization from which you obtain your connection service, or some other authority, or both, will provide the naming service (DNS). You can have a many-to-one mapping of domain names to a single numeric IP.

    2. Let's say I buy a server, I install linux, but then I need to set up user accounts (ALL COMMAND LINE). I supposed the distribution I install may have some bearing on how this is done but are there rules which apply to all flavours.
    There are a smallish number of 'flavours' of Linux configuration schemes. This relates mainly to the organization of configuration files that define the behaviour of your host. For setup of user accounts, there is probably little to no difference in how this is accomplished across the range of major distros. The biggest differences will be in the setup of system services, and networking. In almost all cases, there are config files that are read by shell scripts (almost always some Bourne shell variant, like Bash), and you use a text editor to create the appropriate settings for your installation and requirements. There are many distros that inherit from either the Debian or Redhat base distributions, and the styles used by these two distributions seem to have propagated out to the distros that they spawned.

    The best reference is online. There are tutorials, HOWTOs, and forums such as this one with lots of searchable information. Books go out of date surprisingly quickly, and the really basic stuff that doesn't go out of date, you will learn fairly quickly if you are doing any regular sysdmin work.

    --- rod.
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  5. #5
    Linux User twoHats's Avatar
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    Something to think about:

    You may not need to have a monitor/keyboard/mouse setup - just use ssh.

    There is a debian network setup guide somewhere (quick look didn't get it but a more thorough search will) which is excellent.
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  6. #6
    Linux Enthusiast Bemk's Avatar
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    For the basic sys admin stuff, such as user management, you can take a look at your distro's docs. For things like the setup of apache, you could look into the apache docs. I haven't done so my self, as I haven't had the need yet, but once the time is there, I certainly will.

    DNS stuff isn't really my forte.

    You could be able to use adduser and useradd, to add add a user to your system. Take a look at your distro's docs for which one they support and which one is recommended. Also you can see in the man pages how the command works (if not already described in the distro's docs).

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